Team Work is Hard Work

From reading posts and comments posted to LinkedIn, it seems that a number of our Chapter members and guests from time to time find themselves involved in internal fraud investigations either as members of internal or external audit units or as sole practitioners.  As CFE’s we know that we can make significant contributions to a financial crime investigation, if we can work effectively, as team members, with the victim company’s internal and external auditors, as well as with other constituents involved in resolving allegations or suspicions of internal fraud. In addition to a thorough knowledge of accounting and auditing, CFE’s bring to bear a variety of skills, including interviewing, data mining and analysis.  We also know that some auditors assume that simply auditing more transactions, with the use of standard procedures, increases the likelihood that fraud will be found. While this can prove to be true in some cases, when there is suspicion of actual fraud, the introduction of competent forensic accounting investigators may be more likely to resolve the issue and bring it to a successful conclusion.

Within the boundaries of an investigation, we CFE’s typically deal with numerous constituencies, each with a different interest and each viewing the situation from a different perspective. These parties to the investigation may well attempt to influence the investigative process, favor their individual concerns, and react to events and findings in terms of personal biases. CFE’s thus often have the task of conveying to all constituencies that the results of the investigation will be more reliable if all participants and interested parties work together as a team and contribute their specific expertise or insight with objectivity. In the highly-charged environment created by a financial crime investigation, the forensic accounting investigator can make a huge contribution just by displaying and encouraging the balance and level headedness which comes from his or her detailed familiarity with the mechanics of the standard types of financial fraud.

The ACFE recommends that all parties with a stake in the process, management, audit committee, auditors, and legal counsel, should always consider including forensic accounting investigators in the front-end process of decision making about an investigation. One of the key initial decisions is, usually, the degree to which the forensic accounting investigators can work with and rely on the work of others, specifically, the internal and external auditors. Another common front-end decision is whether CFE’s—with their knowledge of accounting systems, controls, and typical fraud schemes, may be added to the team that eventually evaluates the organization’s business processes to strengthen the controls that allowed the fraud to occur. Management may at first be inclined to push for a quick result because it feels the company will be further damaged if it continues to operate under a shadow.

Senior executives may be unable or in some cases unwilling to see the full scope of issues and may attempt to limit the investigation, sometimes as a matter of self-protection, or they may seek to persuade the CFE that the issues at hand are immaterial. Whatever happened, it happened on their watch, and they may understandably be very sensitive to the CFE’s intrusion into their domain. Any defensiveness on the part of management should be defused as quickly and as thoroughly as possible, usually through empathy and consideration on the part of the forensic accounting investigator. The party or entity engaging the forensic accounting investigator, for example, the audit committee, management, or counsel, should be committed to a thorough investigation of all issues and is ultimately responsible for the investigation. The committee may engage CFE’s and forensic accounting investigators directly and look to them for guidance, or it may ask outside counsel to engage the CFE, who usually will work at counsel’s direction in fulfilling counsel’s responsibilities to the audit committee.

Every CFE should strive to bring independence and objectivity to the investigation and strive to assist each of the interested parties to achieve their unique but related objectives. As to the CFE’s  objectives, those are determined by the scope of work and the desire to meet the goals of whoever retained their services. Regardless of the differing interests of the various constituencies, forensic accounting investigators must typically answer the following questions:

  • Who is involved?
  • Could there be coconspirators?
  • Was the perpetrator instructed by a higher supervisor not currently a target of the investigation?
  • How much is at issue or what is the total impact on the financial statements?
  • Over what period did this occur?
  • Have we identified all material schemes?
  • How did this happen?
  • How was it identified, and could it have been detected earlier?
  • What can be done to deter a recurrence?

CFE’s should always keep in mind that they are primarily fact finders and not typically engaged to reach or provide conclusions, or, more formally, opinions. This differs from the financial auditor’s role. The financial auditor is presented with the books and records to be audited and determines the nature, extent, and timing of audit procedures. On one hand, the financial statements are management’s responsibility, and an auditor confirms they have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles after completing these procedures and assessing the results. The CFE or forensic accounting investigator, on the other hand, commands a different set of skills and works at the direction of an employer that may be management, the audit committee, counsel, or an auditing firm itself.

Teaming with all concerned parties together with the internal and external auditors, the forensic accounting investigator should strive to bring independence and objectivity to the investigation and strive to assist each of the interested parties to achieve each team member’s unique but related objectives; management understandably may be eager to bring the investigation to a quick conclusion. The chief financial officer may be defensive over the fact that his or her organization allowed this to happen;   the board of directors, through the independent members of its audit committee, is likely to focus on conducting a thorough and complete investigation, but its members may lack the experience needed to assess the effort. In addition, they may be concerned about their personal reputations and liability. The board is likely to look to legal counsel and in some cases, to forensic accounting investigators to define the parameters of the project;  as to counsel, in most investigations in which counsel is involved, they are responsible for the overall conduct of the investigation and will assign and allocate resources accordingly; the internal auditor may have a variety of objectives, including not alienating management, staying on schedule to complete the annual audit plan, and not opening the internal audit team to criticism. The internal audit team may also feel embarrassed, angry, and defensive that it did not detect the wrongdoing; the external auditor may have several concerns, including whether the investigative team will conduct an investigation of adequate scope, whether the situation suggests retaining forensic accountants from the auditors’ firm, whether forensic accountants should be added to the audit team, and even whether the investigation will implicate the quality of past audits.

In summary, team work is complex, hard work.  While fraud is not an everyday occurrence at most companies, boards and auditing firms should anticipate the need to conduct a financial fraud investigation at some time in the future.  CFE’s can be an integral part of the planning for such investigations and can be of great help in designing the pre-planned team work protocols that ensure that, if a fraud exists, there is a high probability that it will be identified completely and dealt with in a timely and appropriate manner.

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