Regulating the Financial Data Breach

During several years of my early career, I was employed as a Manager of Operations Research by a mid-sized bank holding company. My small staff and I would endlessly discuss issues related to fraud prevention and develop techniques to keep our customer’s checking and savings accounts safe, secure and private. A never ending battle!

It was a simpler time back then technically but since a large proportion of fraud committed against banks and financial institutions today still involves the illegal use of stolen customer or bank data, some of the newest and most important laws and regulations that management assurance professionals, like CFEs, must be aware of in our practice, and with which our client banks must comply, relate to the safeguarding of confidential data both from internal theft and from breaches of the bank’s information security defenses by outside criminals.

As the ACFE tells us, there is no silver bullet for fully protecting any organization from the ever growing threat of information theft. Yet full implementation of the measures specified by required provisions of now in place federal banking regulators can at least lower the risk of a costly breach occurring. This is particularly true since the size of recent data breaches across all industries have forced Federal enforcement agencies to become increasingly active in monitoring compliance with the critical rules governing the safeguarding of customer credit card data, bank account information, Social Security numbers, and other personal identifying information. Among these key rules are the Federal Reserve Board’s Interagency Guidelines Establishing Information Security Standards, which define customer information as any record containing nonpublic personal information about an individual who has obtained a financial product or service from an institution that is to be used primarily for personal, family, or household purposes and who has an ongoing relationship with the institution.

Its important to realize that, under the Interagency Guidelines, customer information refers not only to information pertaining to people who do business with the bank (i.e., consumers); it also encompasses, for example, information about (1) an individual who applies for but does not obtain a loan; (2) an individual who guarantees a loan; (3) an employee; or (4) a prospective employee. A financial institution must also require, by contract, its own service providers who have access to consumer information to develop appropriate measures for the proper disposal of the information.

The FRB’s Guidelines are to a large extent drawn from the information protection provisions of the Gramm Leach Bliley Act (GLBA) of 1999, which repealed the Depression-era Glass-Steagall Act that substantially restricted banking activities. However, GLBA is best known for its formalization of legal standards for the protection of private customer information and for rules and requirements for organizations to safeguard such information. Since its enactment, numerous additional rules and standards have been put into place to fine-tune the measures that banks and other organizations must take to protect consumers from the identity-related crimes to which information theft inevitably leads.

Among GLBA’s most important information security provisions affecting financial institutions is the so-called Financial Privacy Rule. It requires banks to provide consumers with a privacy notice at the time the consumer relationship is established and every year thereafter.

The notice must provide details collected about the consumer, where that information is shared, how that information is used, and how it is protected. Each time the privacy notice is renewed, the consumer must be given the choice to opt out of the organization’s right to share the information with third-party entities. That means that if bank customers do not want their information sold to another company, which will in all likelihood use it for marketing purposes, they must indicate that preference to the financial institution.

CFEs should note , that most pro-privacy advocacy groups strongly object to this and other privacy related elements of GLBA because, in their view, these provisions do not provide substantive protection of consumer privacy. One major advocacy group has stated that GLBA does not protect consumers because it unfairly places the burden on the individual to protect privacy with an opt-out standard. By placing the burden on the customer to protect his or her data, GLBA weakens customer power to control their financial information. The agreement’s opt-out provisions do not require institutions to provide a standard of protection for their customers regardless of whether they opt-out of the agreement. This provision is based on the assumption that financial companies will share information unless expressly told not to do so by their customers and, if customers neglect to respond, it gives institutions the freedom to disclose customer nonpublic personal information.

CFEs need to be aware, however, that for bank clients, regardless of how effective, or not, GLBA may be in protecting customer information, noncompliance with the Act itself is not an option. Because of the current explosion in breaches of bank information security systems, the privacy issue has to some degree been overshadowed by the urgency to physically protect customer data; for that reason, compliance with the Interagency Guidelines concerning information security is more critical than ever. The basic elements partially overlap with the preventive measures against internal bank employee abuse of the bank’s computer systems. However, they go quite a bit further by requiring banks to:

—Design an information security program to control the risks identified through a security risk assessment, commensurate with the sensitivity of the information and the complexity and scope of its activities.
—Evaluate a variety of policies, procedures, and technical controls and adopt those measures that are found to most effectively minimize the identified risks.
—Application and enforcement of access controls on customer information systems, including controls to authenticate and permit access only to authorized individuals and to prevent employees from providing customer information to unauthorized individuals who may seek to obtain this information through fraudulent means.
—Access restrictions at physical locations containing customer information, such as buildings, computer facilities, and records storage facilities to permit access only to authorized individuals.
—Encryption of electronic customer information, including while in transit or in storage on networks or systems to which unauthorized individuals may gain access.
—Procedures designed to ensure that customer information system modifications are consistent with the institution’s information security program.
—Dual control procedures, segregation of duties, and employee background checks for employees with responsibilities for or access to customer information.
—Monitoring systems and procedures to detect actual and attempted attacks on or intrusions into customer information systems.
—Response programs that specify actions to be taken when the institution suspects or detects that unauthorized individuals have gained access to customer information systems, including appropriate reports to regulatory and law enforcement agencies.
—Measures to protect against destruction, loss, or damage of customer information due to potential environmental hazards, such as fire and water damage or technological failures.

The Interagency Guidelines require a financial institution to determine whether to adopt controls to authenticate and permit only authorized individuals access to certain forms of customer information. Under this control, a financial institution also should consider the need for a firewall to safeguard confidential electronic records. If the institution maintains Internet or other external connectivity, its systems may require multiple firewalls with adequate capacity, proper placement, and appropriate configurations.

Similarly, the institution must consider whether its risk assessment warrants encryption of electronic customer information. If it does, the institution must adopt necessary encryption measures that protect information in transit, in storage, or both. The Interagency Guidelines do not impose specific authentication or encryption standards, so it is advisable for CFEs to consult outside experts on the technical details applicable to your client institution’s security requirements especially when conducting after the fact fraud examinations.

The financial institution also must consider the use of an intrusion detection system to alert it to attacks on computer systems that store customer information. In assessing the need for such a system, the institution should evaluate the ability, or lack thereof, of its staff to rapidly and accurately identify an intrusion. It also should assess the damage that could occur between the time an intrusion occurs and the time the intrusion is recognized and action is taken.

The regulatory agencies have also provided our clients with requirements for responding to information breaches. These are contained in a related document entitled Interagency Guidance on Response Programs for Unauthorized Access to Customer Information and Customer Notice (Incident Response Guidance). According to the Incident Response Guidance, a financial institution should develop and implement a response program as part of its information security program. The response program should address unauthorized access to or use of customer information that could result in substantial harm or inconvenience to a customer.

Finally, the Interagency Guidelines require financial institutions to train staff to prepare and implement their information security programs. The institution should consider providing specialized training to ensure that personnel sufficiently protect customer information in accordance with its information security program.

For example, an institution should:

—Train staff to recognize and respond to schemes to commit fraud or identity theft, such as guarding against pretext spam calling.
—Provide staff members responsible for building or maintaining computer systems and local and wide area networks with adequate training, including instruction about computer security.
—Train staff to properly dispose of customer information.

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