On Motivation

The ACFE tells us that there is no simple profile for employees who commit fraud. However, some ACFE statistics are available. Its research has repeatedly shown that about 10 percent to 15 percent of employees are fundamentally dishonest and are likely to steal from their company if given the opportunity. About 66 percent of employees are likely to steal under the right circumstances, such as when under pressure, or when “everyone is doing it,” and the opportunity exists. In contrast, about 20 percent to 25 percent of employees are fundamentally honest and are unlikely to steal under any circumstances.

Furthermore, those employees who do steal from the company are unlikely to have a prior criminal record, and those with a good education, family, background, and work record can be just as likely to steal as anyone else.

On the other hand, research shows that the three elements of the standard fraud triangle, with which we’re all familiar, have proven themselves descriptive over many the years in explaining which employees may defraud our client companies.

• Pressure – Usually related to financial pressure such as large medical bills, gambling problems, drug habits, and extravagant living.

• Opportunity – Required to commit any fraud.

• Rationalization – Likely depends on the type of criminal and the criminal’s personality type or possible personality disorder.

The rationalization component of the fraud triangle suggests possible types of individuals who may commit fraud:

• The fundamentally dishonest employee without a personality disorder. This person could habitually be dishonest but does not have a personality disorder. Rationalization comes easily because the person is accustomed to dishonesty. Therefore, the rationalizations are likely to include statements such as “I need it more than they do” and “They won’t miss it.”

• The fundamentally dishonest employee with a personality disorder. Various personality disorders may contribute to the ability of the employee to rationalize fraud. Psychiatry uses the diagnosis antisocial personality disorder and the related diagnosis dissocial personality disorder. The following are characteristics that apply to persons with these types of mental disorders:

— Nonconformist behavior; tend to be misfits.
— Habitual lying and dishonesty.
— Impulsiveness.
— Irritability and aggressiveness.
— Insensitivity to harming self or others.
— Strong disregard for the needs of self and others.
— Tendency to blame others for personal faults and mistakes.
— Lack of responsibility.
— Difficulty in establishing and maintaining close relationships.
— Absence of the ability to feel emotions or the full range of normal emotions.

The deceitfulness dimension of these disorders could enable the person to hide some or all of his or her antisocial characteristics. This type of person is often able to steal without giving much conscious thought to rationalizations. The crime could simply arise out of the mental disturbance.

• Then there is the normally honest employee who steals given pressure and opportunity and rationalizes the theft. A person who does not normally steal is likely to give serious thought to rationalizing the theft. One common rationalization is that the person is only borrowing the money; often the person takes money with the intent to pay it back, and many times does in fact pay it back. The result is that the corporate till can become the employee’s personal lending institution; however, in many cases, the person is never able to pay back the ill-gotten loan. The normally honest employee is likely to steal out of a sudden financial need or because of a problem with a financially excessive lifestyle.

The ACFE advises us to consider possible motives when examining evidence related to an occupational fraud. Motive is the power that prompts a person to act. Motive, however, should not be confused with intent, which refers to the state of mind of the accused when performing the act. Motive, unlike intent, is not an essential element of crime, and criminal law generally treats a person’s motive as irrelevant in determining guilt or innocence. Even so, motive is relevant for other purposes: it can help identify the perpetrator; it will often guide the examiner to the proper rationalization; it further incriminates the accused; and it can be helpful in ensuring successful prosecution.

The examiner should search relevant documents to determine a possible motive. For example, if a fraud examiner has evidence in the form of a paycheck written to a ghost employee, s/he might suspect a payroll employee who recently complained about not having received a raise in the past two years. Although such information does not mean that the payroll employee committed fraud, the possible motive can guide the examiner.

During the process of interviewing suspects, interviewers should seek to understand the possible motives of interviewees. To do this, interviewers should suspend their own value system. This will better position the interviewer(s) to persuade suspects to reveal information providing insight into what might have pressured or motivated them and how they might have rationalized their actions.

In an interview situation, the examiner should not suggest reasons for the crime. Instead, the examiner should let the individual share his or her motivations, even if the suspect reveals those motivations in an indirect manner.

In interviewing suspects for motives:

• Leave your ego at the door.
• Talk to the suspected perpetrator as an adult.
• Do not patronize the suspect.
• Use good communication skills to develop rapport with subjects so that they will feel comfortable talking to you.
• Avoid being confrontational with the suspect. If the interviewer is confrontational, the perpetrator will be less likely to make an admission.

When conducting an interview with a suspect, the interviewer should begin by asking questions about the standard procedures and the actual practice of the operations at issue. This is necessary to gain an understanding of the way the relevant process is intended to work and how it actually works. Additionally, asking such basic questions early in the interview will help the interviewer observe the interviewee’s “normal” behavior so that the interviewer can notice any changes in the subject’s mannerisms and word choice.

Next, the interviewer might ask non-accusatory questions related to the issue at hand, such as:

• Why do you think someone would do something like this?
• What do you think should happen to a person who would do something like this?
• Of all of the people who work in this area, who could be involved?

The answers to these questions can help the interviewer understand the possible motives of various suspects, narrow the pool of suspects, or even obtain an admission. For example, a suspect who answers the question “Why do you think someone would do something like this?” with a sympathetic answer might be trying to appeal to the interviewer’s sense of compassion to reduce or minimize his or her punishment.

The more the interviewer knows about the perpetrator, the better chance s/he will have of identifying the perpetrator’s motive and rationalization. Once the perpetrator thinks that the interviewer understands her motive, she will become more likely to confess.

During the motivation identifying interview, fraud examiners must also remember that there are times when rational people behave irrationally. This is important in the interview process because it will help humanize the misconduct. Unless the perpetrator has a mental or emotional disorder, it is acceptable to expect that the perpetrator committed the fraud for a reason.

Situational fraudsters, those who rationalize their right to an illegal enrichment and perpetrate fraud when the opportunity arises, do not tend to view themselves as criminals. This is in contrast to deviant fraudsters, who are more proactive than situational fraudsters and who are always on the alert for opportunities to commit fraud. Situational fraudsters rationalize their crimes. Situational fraudsters feel that they need to commit fraud to regain control over their lives. Thus, an interviewer will be more likely to obtain a confession from a situational fraudster if s/he can genuinely communicate that s/he understands how anyone under similar-circumstances might commit such a crime. Genuineness, however, is key. If the fraudster in any way detects that the interviewer is constructing a trap, s/he generally will not make an admission of wrongdoing.

In summary, the fraud triangle is always helpful in explaining motivations for employees to defraud their employing organization by drawing attention to pressure, opportunity, and rationalization. Pressure is typically caused by sudden financial needs arising from things such as medical bills, gambling problems, drug habits, and extravagant living. The opportunity depends on the employee’s position and the strength of the company’s internal control processes. Rationalization depends on the type of criminal. The pure sociopath may need little or no rationalization. The fundamentally dishonest employee may give some conscious thought to rationalizing crimes, but the rationalization comes easily because the person is accustomed to dishonesty. Finally, the normally honest employee generally expends the most effort in rationalizing the crime, and often this type of person will really think that s/he is only borrowing the money.

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