Investigating on the Internet

online-investigationThis May our Chapter, along with our partners the Virginia State Police and national ACFE will be hosting a two day seminar – ‘Investigating on the Internet – Research Tools for Fraud Examiners’.  This in-depth session will be taught by Liseli Pennings, Deputy Training Director for the ACFE.  We’ll begin enrolling students in mid-March, so pencil in the dates, May 18th and 19th!

Fraud examiners now have the ability to gain insights from, and test correlations with, a vast array of investigative relevant information on the Internet, which can be as diverse as suspect competitor information, regulatory filings, and conversations on social media.  Such analytics can provide CFE investigators with a variety of capabilities from investigative planning and risk assessment to fieldwork. They also enable fraud examination practitioners to provide clients with more compelling information about every experienced fraud.

Internet based investigation tools can be classified into three broad categories:

–Retrospective statistical analysis, used to gain deeper insight into important sub-processes in financial and operational areas related to the investigation subject.

–Forward-looking models, built to predict which areas of the business are riskier or simply require a greater level of fraud prevention focus.

–Advanced visualization analytics, used to help transform the investigation by providing deep analytical insights and actionable information through visual tools like interactive charts and dynamic graphics. In short, investigation on the internet has rapidly evolved from simply allowing CFE’s the ability to provide perspective in hindsight to helping them assemble rich digital views of the present investigative situation. Investigative, internet based analytics provide investigators with the potential to dramatically increase the value of the insights they can provide clients at every level of the examination from evaluation of business risks, to suspect analysis, and on to prosecutorial issues and challenges.

The first step in deploying internet based investigative tools effectively is determining the exact fraud scenario that needs to be addressed – what are the features constituting the scenario under review? Once specific fraud features have been identified, on-line analytical capabilities can be used to source facts, drive understanding, and generate knowledge by addressing three general questions:

–What data can be leveraged to enhance understanding of the exact fraud scenario and improve the performance of its investigation? It’s important to understand the source of the on-line data available and the systems and processes that produce it. Effective data evaluation by the examiner supports the accuracy, completeness, and reliability of the data used in her investigation.

–What is known about the general type of business processes related to the fraud?

–Exactly what fraud scenario is suspected to have transpired and why? What steps should be taken by the client immediately?

Canny use of the internet by the trained investigator can play an important role in answering these questions with a view to optimizing immediate investigative performance. The knowledgeable examiner can frequently look at on-line data from within the organization and outside it, with a focus on patterns, data mining and optimization, data visualization, advanced algorithms, neural analysis, and social networks.

These data can provide powerful insight into every aspect of our cases under investigation. In addition to examination field-work one of the most important uses of internet based investigative tools is to enhance fraud risk management. Analytics available on-line from the ACFE and others help provide a clearer understanding of risks and furnish insights as to how they can be mitigated. Ultimately, the objective is to develop and implement an analytical capability that provides the individual CFE with greater insight into the control failures associated with each major category of fraud. A second important use for internet analytics is to develop a deeper understanding of common fraud related issues. Once a potential issue has been identified, analytics can source the facts (e.g., what does the data tell us about the issue?), drive understanding of the facts (e.g., what has happened?), and generate knowledge (e.g., why did it happen?) to ultimately build a more complete presentation of fraud report findings. A third area for CFE’s to consider is how to leverage the use of the analytics performed for the fraud examination for use by the client throughout their organization. In this regard, the CFE’s report can become an important change agent, driving fraud prevention insights throughout the organization. Business managers and leaders of other organizational risk functions have a need to understand fraud risks and the correlations between data. In many cases, fraud investigative tools developed for use during a fraud examination can evolve into valuable fraud prevention tools and ownership can be transferred to business or functional leaders for ongoing use.

Consider keeping the following in mind when using internet based investigative tools in your investigation:

–Establish a clear understanding of what you’re trying to achieve in your investigation and ensure a linkage to examination planning. This should translate into defined objectives that drive the strategy and long-term vision for the use of the tools as well as surface near-term opportunities.

–Know the data.  It’s important for examiners to understand both the data they have and the data they don’t have when determining how and where to begin using the internet as an investigative tool. This knowledge also prioritizes efforts to collect what’s missing for future analyses and for enhancements to the data driven investigative program.

–Start with a targeted, ad hoc program which will likely yield greater benefits in terms of speeding insights, learning, and long term value. Take the time to learn first and then deploy necessary capabilities across your tool kit.

–Lever existing cumulative insights. These ever building insights may provide clues related to the risks and related fraud scenarios to start with, jump-starting the investigative program and build consistency with prior initiatives.

–Take steps to develop a written plan early on in every examination to take action and measure results accurately. Don’t forget that the client organization, systems, and processes that support fraud response and control remediation must be able to take action working with the insights that your final report provides.

Fraud examiners stand at the beginning of a new era in the use of internet based data to enhance the entire fraud examination life cycle. Taking the steps outlined above can help individual practitioners realize gains in effectiveness and efficiency while providing enhanced investigative services.

Please make plans to join your fellow RVACFE Chapter members and guests for an outstanding learning experience on May 18th and 19th.  You won’t be disappointed!

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