Industrialized Theft

In at least one way you have to hand it to Ethically Challenged, Inc.;  it sure knows how to innovate, and the recent spate of ransomware attacks proves they also know how to make what’s old new again. Although society’s criminal opponents engage in constant business process improvement, they’ve proven again and again that they’re not just limited to committing new crimes from scratch every time. In the age of Moore’s law, these tasks have been readily automated and can run in the background at scale without the need for significant human intervention. Crime automations like the WannaCry virus allow transnational organized crime groups to gain the same efficiencies and cost savings that multinational corporations obtained by leveraging technology to carry out their core business functions. That’s why today it’s possible for hackers to rob not just one person at a time but 100 million or more, as the world saw with the Sony PlayStation and Target data breaches and now with the WannaCry worm.

As covered in our Chapter’s training event of last year, ‘Investigating on the Internet’, exploit tool kits like Blackhole and SpyEye commit crime “automagically” by minimizing the need for human labor, thereby dramatically reducing criminal costs. They also allow hackers to pursue the “long tail” of opportunity, committing millions of thefts in small amounts so that (in many cases) victims don’t report them and law enforcement has no way to track them. While high-value targets (companies, nations, celebrities, high-net-worth individuals) are specifically and individually targeted, the way the majority of the public is hacked is by automated scripted computer malware, one large digital fishing net that scoops up anything and everything online with a vulnerability that can be exploited. Given these obvious advantages, as of 2016 an estimated 61 percent of all online attacks were launched by fully automated crime tool kits, returning phenomenal profits for the Dark Web overlords who expertly orchestrated them. Modern crime has become reduced and distilled to a software program that anybody can run at tremendous profit.

Not only can botnets and other tools be used over and over to attack and offend, but they’re now enabling the commission of much more sophisticated crimes such as extortion, blackmail, and shakedown rackets. In an updated version of the old $500 million Ukrainian Innovative Marketing solutions “virus detected” scam, fraudsters have unleashed a new torrent of malware that hold the victim’s computer hostage until a ransom is paid and an unlock code is provided by the scammer to regain access to the victim’s own files. Ransomware attack tools are included in a variety of Dark Net tool kits, such as WannaCry and Gameover Zeus. According to the ACFE, there are several varieties of this scam, including one that purports to come from law enforcement. Around the world, users who become infected with the Reveton Trojan suddenly have their computers lock up and their full screens covered with a notice, allegedly from the FBI. The message, bearing an official-looking large, full-color FBI logo, states that the user’s computer has been locked for reasons such as “violation of the federal copyright law against illegally downloaded material” or because “you have been viewing or distributing prohibited pornographic content.”

In the case of the Reveton Trojan, to unlock their computers, users are informed that they must pay a fine ranging from $200 to $400, only accepted using a prepaid voucher from Green Dot’s MoneyPak, which victims are instructed they can buy at their local Walmart or CVS; victims of WannaCry are required to pay in BitCoin. To further intimidate victims and drive home the fact that this is a serious police matter, the Reveton scammers prominently display the alleged violator’s IP address on their screen as well as snippets of video footage previously captured from the victim’s Webcam. As with the current WannaCry exploit, the Reveton scam has successfully targeted tens of thousands of victims around the world, with the attack localized by country, language, and police agency. Thus, users in the U.K. see a notice from Scotland Yard, other Europeans get a warning from Europol, and victims in the United Arab Emirates see the threat, translated into Arabic, purportedly from the Abu Dhabi Police HQ.

WannaCry is even more pernicious than Reveton though in that it actually encrypts all the files on a victim’s computer so that they can no longer be read or accessed. Alarmingly, variants of this type of malware often present a ticking-bomb-type countdown clock advising users that they only have forty-eight hours to pay $300 or all of their files will be permanently destroyed. Akin to threatening “if you ever want to see your files alive again,” these ransomware programs gladly accept payment in Bitcoin. The message to these victims is no idle threat. Whereas previous ransomware might trick users by temporarily hiding their files, newer variants use strong 256-bit Advanced Encryption Standard cryptography to lock user files so that they become irrecoverable. These types of exploits earn scores of millions of dollars for the criminal programmers who develop and sell them on-line to other criminals.

Automated ransomware tools have even migrated to mobile phones, affecting Android handset users in certain countries. Not only have individuals been harmed by the ransomware scourge, so too have companies, nonprofits, and even government agencies, the most infamous of which was the Swansea Police Department in Massachusetts some years back, which became infected when an employee opened a malicious e-mail attachment. Rather than losing its irreplaceable police case files to the scammers, the agency was forced to open a Bitcoin account and pay a $750 ransom to get its files back. The police lieutenant told the press he had no idea what a Bitcoin was or how the malware functioned until his department was struck in the attack.

As the ACFE and other professional organizations have told us, within its world, cybercrime has evolved highly sophisticated methods of operation to sell everything from methamphetamine to child sexual abuse live streamed online. It has rapidly adopted existing tools of anonymity such as the Tor browser to establish Dark Net shopping malls, and criminal consulting services such as hacking and murder for hire are all available at the click of a mouse. Untraceable and anonymous digital currencies, such as Bitcoin, are breathing new life into the underground economy and allowing for the rapid exchange of goods and services. With these additional revenues, cyber criminals are becoming more disciplined and organized, significantly increasing the sophistication of their operations. Business models are being automated wherever possible to maximize profits and botnets can threaten legitimate global commerce, easily trained on any target of the scammer’s choosing. Fundamentally, it’s been done. As WannaCry demonstrates, the computing and Internet based crime machine has been built. With these systems in place, the depth and global reach of cybercrime, mean that crime now scales, and it scales exponentially. Yet, as bad as this threat is today, it is about to become much worse, as we hand such scammers billions of more targets for them to attack as we enter the age of ubiquitous computing and the Internet of Things.

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