Category Archives: Risk Assessment

The Human Financial Statement

A finance professor of mine in graduate school at the University of Richmond was fond of saying, in relation to financial statement fraud, that as staff competence goes down, the risk of fraud goes up. What she meant by that was that the best operated, most flawless control ever put in place can be tested and tested and tested again and score perfectly every time. But its still no match for the employee who doesn’t know, or perhaps doesn’t even care, how to operate that control; or for the manager who doesn’t read the output correctly, or for the executive who hides part of a report and changes the numbers in the rest. That’s why CFEs and the members of any fraud risk assessment team (especially our client managers who actually own the process and its results), should always take a careful look at the human component of risk; the real-world actions, and lack thereof, taken by real-life employees in addressing the day-to-day duties of their jobs.

ACFE training emphasizes that client management must evaluate whether it has implemented anti-fraud controls that adequately address the risk that a material misstatement in the financial statements will not be prevented or detected timely and then focus on fixing or developing controls to fill any gaps. The guidance offers several specific suggestions for conducting top-down, risk-based anti-fraud focused evaluations, and many of them require the active participation of staff drawn from all over the assessed enterprise. The ACFE documentation also recommends that management consider whether a control is manual or automated, its complexity, the risk of management override, and the judgment required to operate it. Moreover, it suggests that management consider the competence of the personnel who perform the control or monitor its performance.

That’s because the real risk of financial statement misstatements lies not in a company’s processes or the controls around them, but in the people behind the processes and controls who make the organization’s control environment such a dynamic, challenging piece of the corporate puzzle. Reports and papers that analyze fraud and misstatement risk use words like “mistakes” and “improprieties.” Automated controls don’t do anything “improper.” Properly programmed record-keeping and data management processes don’t make “mistakes.” People make mistakes, and people commit improprieties. Of course, human error has always been and will always be part of the fraud examiner’s universe, and an SEC-encouraged, top-down, risk-based assessment of a company’s control environment, with a view toward targeting the control processes that pose the greatest misstatement risk, falls nicely within most CFE’s existing operational ambit. The elevated role for CFEs, whether on staff or in independent private practice, in optionally conducting fraud risk evaluations offers our profession yet another chance to show its value.

Focusing on the human element of misstatement fraud risk is one important way our client companies can make significant progress in identifying their true financial statement and other fraud exposures. It also represents an opportunity for management to identify the weak links that could ultimately result in a misstatement, as well as for CFEs to make management’s evaluation process a much simpler task. I can remember reading many articles in the trade press these last years in which commentators have opined that dramatic corporate meltdowns like Wells Fargo are still happening today, under today’s increased regulatory strictures, because the controls involved in those frauds weren’t the problem, the people were. That is certainly true. Hence, smart risk assessors are integrating the performance information they come across in their risk assessments on soft controls into management’s more quantitative, control-related evaluation data to paint a far more vivid picture of what the risks look like. Often the risks will wear actual human faces. The biggest single factor in calculating restatement risk as a result of a fraud relates to the complexity of the control(s) in question and the amount of human judgment involved. The more complex a control, the more likely it is to require complicated input data and to involve highly technical calculations that make it difficult to determine from system output alone whether something is wrong with the process itself. Having more human judgment in the mix gives rise to greater apparent risk.

A computer will do exactly what you tell it to over and over; a human may not, but that’s what makes humans special, special and risky. In the case of controls, especially fraud prevention related controls, our human uniqueness can manifest as simple afternoon sleepiness or family financial troubles that prove too distracting to put aside during the workday. So many things can result in a mistaken judgment, and simple mistakes in judgment can be extremely material to the final financial statements.

CFEs, of course, aren’t in the business of grading client employees or of even commenting to them about their performance but whether the fraud risk assessment in question is related to financial report integrity or to any other issue, CFEs in making such assessments at management’s request need to consider the experience, training, quality, and capabilities of the people performing the most critical controls.

You can have a well-designed control, but if the person in charge doesn’t know, or care, what to do, that control won’t operate. And whether such a lack of ability, or of concern, is at play is a judgment call that assessing CFEs shouldn’t be afraid to make. A negative characterization of an employee’s capability doesn’t mean that employee is a bad worker, of course. It may simply mean he or she is new to the job, or it may reveal training problems in that employee’s department. CFEs proactively involved in fraud risk assessment need to keep in mind that, in some instances, competence may be so low that it results in greater risk. Both the complexity of a control and the judgment required to operate it are important. The ability to interweave notions of good and bad judgment into the fabric of a company’s overall fraud risk comes from CFEs experience doing exactly that on fraud examinations. A critical employee’s intangibles like conscientiousness, commitment, ethics and morals, and honesty, all come into play and either contribute to a stronger fraud control environment or cause it to deteriorate. CFEs need to be able, while acting as professional risk assessors, to challenge to management the quality, integrity, and motivation of employees at all levels of the organization.

Many companies conduct fraud-specific tests as a component of the fraud prevention program, and many of the most common forms of fraud can be detected by basic controls already in place. Indeed, fraud is a common concern throughout all routine audits, as opposed to the conduct of separate fraud-only audits. It can be argued that every internal control is a fraud deterrent control. But fraud still exists.

What CFEs have to offer to the risk assessment of financial statement and other frauds is their overall proficiency in fraud detection and the reality that they are well-versed in, and cognizant of, the risk of fraud in every given business process of the company; they are, therefore, well positioned to apply their best professional judgment to the assessment of the degree of risk of financial statement misstatement that fraud represents in any given client enterprise.

Fraud Risk Assessing the Trusted Insider

A bank employee accesses her neighbor’s accounts on-line and discloses this information to another person living in the neighborhood; soon everyone seems to be talking about the neighbor’s financial situation. An employee of a mutual fund company accesses his father-in-law’s accounts without a legitimate reason or permission from the unsuspecting relative and uses the information to pressure his wife into making a bad investment from which the father-in-law, using money from the fund account, ultimately pays to extricate his daughter. Initially, out of curiosity, an employee at a local hospital accesses admission records of a high-profile athlete whom he recognized in the emergency room but then shares that information (for a price) with a tabloid newspaper reporter who prints a story.

Each of these is an actual case and each is a serious violation of various Federal privacy laws. Each of these three scenarios were not the work of an anonymous intruder lurking in cyberspace or of an identity thief who compromised a data center. Rather, this database browsing was perpetrated by a trusted insider, an employee whose daily duties required them to have access to vast databases housing financial, medical and educational information. From the comfort and anonymity of their workstations, similar employees are increasingly capable of accessing personal information for non-business reasons and, sometimes, to support the accomplishment of actual frauds. The good news is that CFE’s can help with targeted fraud risk assessments specifically tailored to assess the probability of this threat type and then to advise management on an approach to its mitigation.

The Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission’s (COSO’s) 2013 update of the Internal Control Integrated Framework directs organizations to conduct a fraud risk assessment as part of their overall risk assessment. The discussion of fraud in COSO 2013 centers on Principle 8: “The organization considers the potential for fraud in assessing risks to the achievement of objectives.” Under the 1992 COSO framework, most organizations viewed fraud risk primarily in terms of satisfying the U.S. Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 requirements to identify fraud controls to prevent or detect fraud risk at the transaction level. In COSO 2013, fraud risk becomes a specific component of the overall risk assessment that focuses on fraud at the entity and transaction levels. COSO now requires a strong internal control foundation that addresses fraud broadly to encompass company objectives as part of its strategy, operations, compliance, and reporting. Principle 8 describes four specific areas: fraudulent financial reporting, fraudulent nonfinancial reporting, misappropriation of assets, and illegal acts. The inclusion of non-financial reporting is a meaningful change that addresses sustainability, health and safety, employment activity and similar reports.

One useful document for performing a fraud risk assessment is Managing the Business Risk of Fraud: A Practical Guide, produced by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, and by our organization, the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, as well as by the Institute of Internal Auditors. This guide to establishing a fraud risk management program includes a sample fraud policy document, fraud prevention scorecard, and lists of fraud exposures and controls. Managing the Business Risk of Fraud advises organizations to view fraud risk assessment as part of their corporate governance effort. This commitment requires a tone at the top that embraces strong governance practices, including written policies that describe the expectations of the board and senior management regarding fraud risk. The Guide points out that as organizations continue to automate key processes and implement technology, thus allowing employees broad access to sensitive data, misuse of that data becomes increasingly difficult to detect and prevent. By combining aggressive data collection strategies with innovative technology, public and private sector organizations have enjoyed dramatic improvements in productivity and service delivery that have contributed to their bottom line. Unfortunately, while these practices have yielded major societal benefits, they have also created a major challenge for those charged with protecting confidential data.

CFE’s proactively assessing client organizations which use substantial amounts of private customer information (PCI) for fraud risk should expect to see the presence of controls related to data access surveillance. Data surveillance is the systematic monitoring of information maintained in an automated, usually in a database, environment. The kinds of controls CFE’s should look for are the presence of a privacy strategy that combines the establishment of a comprehensive policy, an awareness program that reinforces the consequences of non-business accesses, a monitoring tool that provides for ongoing analysis of database activity, an investigative function to resolve suspect accesses and a disciplinary component to hold violators accountable.

The creation of an enterprise confidentiality policy on the front end of the implementation of a data surveillance program is essential to its success. An implementing organization should establish a data access policy that clearly explains the relevant prohibitions, provides examples of prohibited activity and details the consequences of non-business accesses. This policy must apply to all employees, regardless of their title, seniority or function. The AICP/ACFE Guide recommends that all employees, beginning with the CEO, be required to sign an annual acknowledgment affirming that they have received and read the confidentiality policy and understand that violations will result in the imposition of disciplinary action. No employees are granted access to any system housing confidential data until they have first signed the acknowledgment.

In addition to issuing a policy, it is imperative that organizations formally train employees regarding its various provisions and caution them on the consequences of accessing data for non-business purposes. During the orientation process for new hires, all employees should receive specialized training on the confidentiality policy. As an added reminder, prior to logging on to any database that contains personal information, employees should receive an electronic notice stating that their activities are being monitored and that all accesses must be related to an official business purpose. Employees are not granted access into the system until they electronically acknowledge this notice.

Given that data surveillance is a process of ongoing monitoring of database activity, it is necessary for individual accesses to be captured and maintained in a format conducive to analysis. There are many commercially available software tools which can be used to monitor access to relational databases on a real-time basis. Transaction tracking technology, as one example, can dynamically generate Structured Query Language (SQL), based upon various search criteria, and provides the capability for customized analyses within each application housing confidential data. The search results are available in Microsoft Excel, PDF and table formats, and may be printed, e-mailed and archived.

Our CFE client organizations that establish a data access policy and formally notify all employees of the provisions of that policy, institute an ongoing awareness program to reinforce the policy and implement technology to track individual accesses of confidential data have taken the initial steps toward safeguarding data. These are necessary components of a data surveillance program and serve as the foundation upon which the remainder of the process may be based. That said, it is critical that organizations not rely solely on these components, as doing so will result in an unwarranted sense of security. Without an ongoing monitoring process to detect questionable database activity and a comprehensive investigative function to address unauthorized accesses, the impact of the foregoing measures will be marginal.

The final piece of a data surveillance program is the disciplinary process. The ACFE tells us that employees who willfully violate the policy prohibiting nonbusiness access of confidential information must be disciplined; the exact nature of which discipline should be determined by executive management. Without a structured disciplinary process, employees will realize that their database browsing, even if detected, will not result in any consequence and, therefore, they will not be deterred from this type of misconduct. Without an effective disciplinary component, an organization’s privacy protection program will ultimately fail.

The bottom line is that our client organizations that maintain confidential data need to develop measures to protect this asset from internal as well as from external misuse, without imposing barriers that restrict their employees’ ability to perform their duties. In today’s environment, those who are perceived as being unable to protect the sensitive data entrusted to them will inevitably experience an erosion of consumer confidence, and the accompanying consequences. Data surveillance deployed in conjunction with a clear data access policy, an ongoing employee awareness program, an innovative monitoring process, an effective investigative function and a standardized disciplinary procedure are the component controls the CFE should look for when conducting a proactive fraud risk assessment of employee access to PCI.

On Business Process Flow

During the last few years attention has increasingly turned to consideration of client critical business processes functioning as a unified whole as a focus of both risk assessment and fraud prevention efforts.  As result of this attention has come the accompanying realization that superior design of individual business processes is not only critical to the success of the overall organization but to its fraud prevention effort as well. For example, take bid preparation, a process that is usually conducted under time pressure, and requires cross-organizational coordination involving the finance, marketing and production departments. If this process is badly designed, it may slow down processing and lead to late submission of the bid or to an inadequately organized bid, reducing the chances of winning the tender, all outcomes that increase the risk of the emergence of irregularities and perhaps even to the enhanced facilitation of actual fraud. 

An additional realization has been that business processes require process based management.  As CFE’s, our client organizations are usually divided into functional units (e.g., finance, marketing). Many business processes, however, like the bid process, are cross-organizational, involving several functions within the organization.  A raw material purchasing process flows through the warehouse, logistics, purchasing and finance functions. Although each unit may function impeccably independently, the process may be impaired due to a lack of coordination among the units. To prevent the obvious fraud vulnerabilities related to this problem, the ACFE emphasizes the need to manage the business process fraud prevention effort end to end. This includes appointing a process owner; setting performance standards (e.g., time, quality, cost); and establishing (and risk assessing) the control, monitoring and measurement of all the processes at work. 

In the modern business world, change is constantly occurring; admirable as this fact is from an innovation perspective, anything that creates change, especially rapid change, can constitute opportunity for the ethically challenged.  Despite this and associated risks, to ensure its competitiveness, the organization must continuously improve and adapt its business processes. Automated processes based on information systems are usually more difficult and expensive to change than manual processes (of which there are fewer left every day). Modifications to traditional program code require time and human resources, resulting in delays and high costs. Hence, to maintain business agility, automating business processes requires a technology that supports rapid modifications and often, less management oversight and control and more vulnerability to fraud. 

Any business that is successful over the long term has most likely performed some kind of risk assessment, and had some success at managing business risks. Managers of successful entities have thought out what risks could have a significant negative impact on their ability to successfully execute the business plan, or even just cause a substantial loss of business, and have attempted to provided mitigating activities to address those risks. With the pervasiveness of fraud and, more important, their increasing dependence on cross organizational business processes, entities have had to consider a fraud risk assessment as a sizeable portion of any fraud prevention effort. Yet, many entities struggle with the issue or, if convinced of the need to conduct an assessment across business process flows, with where to begin in performing an effective one. 

The primary focus of a cross-organizational business process fraud risk assessment is to identify risks that the totality of such business processes present to the business, i.e., adverse effects related to these processes, whether taken as a whole or individually, are not in the best interests of the entity. These risks are usually associated with business elements such as the ability to deliver the service/product efficiently and effectively, the ability to comply with regulations or contractual obligations, the effectiveness of systems (especially accounting systems and financial reporting systems), and the effective management of the entity in general (to achieve goals and objectives, to successfully achieve the business model). Weak anti-fraud controls can introduce risks in any of these areas, and more. For instance, robust anti-fraud controls can enhance the entity’s ability to sell its products over the internet, or move costs (clerical functions) from within the entity (employees) to customers outside the entity (e.g., online banking and the need to ask questions about accounts).   The bottom line is that there is a need to have an effective identification and assessment of business process risks where the risks are at a degree that is more than trivial. 

Typically, fraud risk is assessed as both a probability of occurrence and a magnitude of effect, or the product of the two. The greater that product, the more significant that risk is to the entity, and the more it needs to be mitigated. Therefore, for each cross-organizational process risk, someone is asking the questions: what is the magnitude of the identified fraud risk/failure (e.g., monetary loss)? What is the likelihood of it occurring (e.g., a percentage)? One thing the CFE can do is to obtain a copy of the client’s current risk assessment document. If management does not have one, or if it is in their head, then by default, assurance over fraud risk being properly mitigated is lowered. Another good start is to obtain the client’s business model; goals, objectives and strategies; and policies and procedures documents. A review of these documents will enable the CFE to understand where cross business process fraud risks could occur.   

Another thing the CFE should do is gain a good understanding of the loss prevention function (if there is one), including its managerial and operational aspects. Then, depending on the entity, there could be an extensive list of technologies or systems that will need to be evaluated for risk in operations. From the management side, it includes the internal audit and loss prevention staffs. A measure of the competency of staff devoted to the fraud prevention effort is a key factor. Obviously, the more competent the staff, the lower the risks associated with all the elements of operations they affect, and vice versa. 

Since traditional systems are transaction based and handle each transaction and business document separately, it’s difficult to audit processes end to end.  Therefore, in such systems proper audit trails should be designed and implemented to ensure that a chronological record of all events that have occurred is maintained.  A focus on entire business processes, by contrast, is process flow based and therefore audit trails are a built-in feature.  In automated systems featuring this type of inter-process flow, all incidents and steps of multi-business processes are documented and linked to each other in the order they occurred.  

From the access control aspect of operations, an assessment should be made as to risk of unauthorized activities. For example, do access controls sufficiently limit access to systems and supported business process flows by effective authorization and authentication controls? Does the information management test new systems and applications thoroughly before deployment? Is there a sufficient staging area so that business process flow support applications can be tested not only on a stand-alone basis but also when interfaced with other applications and whole systems? If applications are not tested, this would lead the CFE to have less assurance about mitigating fraud risks facilitated by bugs and system failures.

The focus of fraud mitigation has moved, with increasing automation, away from the simple single fraud scenario to the entire flow of the interlocking business processes constituting the modern organization and their analytic footprint. 

The Internet & the Unforeseen

Liseli Pennings, last year’s speaker for our Central Virginia Chapter’s training event, ‘Investigating on the Internet’, made the comment during her presentation that on-line investigative tools are outstanding for working unforeseen fraud events.  When a potential fraud risk has been identified through routine risk assessment, what its effects would be can be discussed and hypothetically anticipated to some degree as part of the assessment.  However, Liseli pointed out, when catastrophic fraud events occur without warning, seemingly out of the blue, and no mitigation has been discussed or is even immediately possible, the results can be devastating to our clients. When these types of sudden, unforeseen fraud events occur, rapid information gathering can be critical to a successful investigative outcome and that’s where skillful use of the internet comes in.

Liseli’s comment got me to thinking about a key question.  Are these types of fraud events truly unforeseeable or are they caused by a failure to gather adequate information on the front end to anticipate them and their effects? Unanticipated fraud events and their effects typically are associated with financial factors. However, as we’ve often discussed on this blog, some of the most catastrophic events can be non-financial in nature, such as damage to reputation, which also can lead to financial losses. As part of their proactive risk assessment processes, fraud examiners can play a vital role in monitoring the client’s environment and providing valuable information to management to help identify and mitigate these types of risks.  If an organization is not prepared for these types of sudden, catastrophic fraud events, the losses can sink the organization; only look at what happened to Martha Stewart Enterprises because of her trading scandal and to Target because of the overnight revelation of the hacking of its customer accounts as well as to a host of others.

Viewed narrowly in hindsight, there seems to have been little these companies could realistically have done on the front end to mitigate the effects of such unforeseen events.  The only way to manage such events effectively is to convert them from unforeseen to foreseeable events with potential for catastrophic losses that can be mitigated through anticipation and preparation. Anticipating the potential for such events is critical, requiring information that is current, forward-looking, frequent, comprehensive, reliable, and diversified and available, to an ever-growing extent, to the CFE on the public internet.  Systematic use of the internet to broaden the scope of fraud risk assessment is a trend only now firmly taking hold.

Fraud prevention and mitigation related decision-making takes place in the present and affects the present but, more importantly, it affects the future. Historic information is valuable for some decisions but, to be effective, the information gathered for most decisions must be current and updated continuously. In this respect, CFE’s and risk managers should consider the nature of the information source and the frequency with which it is updated. For example, printed encyclopedias become dated quickly. Web and mobile sources may be considered the most current, but, as Liseli pointed out last year, this is not always the case. The very abundance of internet related resources requires of those gathering on-line information that they exercise extra care in specifying how information is verified and how often as well as when and under what circumstances it is updated.  To have comprehensive and diversified information, examiners must accept that some information they uncover won’t be completely reliable. Knowing that, they must have a methodology for evaluating the degree of reliability of each source, gathering corroborating and refuting information, and discerning the truth among the conflicting information.

When assessing the probability potential for unforeseen fraud events within the context of a client environment, CFE’s and loss prevention managers should avoid the tendency to plan and act based solely on past events and risks. Internet based scanning and assessment systems and processes ideally should be developed to anticipate the next wave of risks that might be carrying unforeseen events ever closer to the organization. It would be simple if dealing with one unforeseen fraud event eliminated all others but fraud examiners especially are aware of how often one fraud spawns another.

In casting a wider, on-line based, risk assessment net forward looking examiners might ask questions like:

–What is the next wave of technological, societal, industrial, and environmental changes that could affect my client organization, and what will be their implications for the organization?

–Have organizations that have a “bring-your-own-device” policy for cell phones, tablets, and other devices considered all the potential implications of such a policy, including privacy issues and the potential risk to proprietary information?

–What information on these devices is discoverable in legal cases?

–Are these sources included in the fraud assessment process?

–How quickly are events changing within the organization and its environment?

How do CFE’s sift through this deluge of information to glean what is relevant to the organization? What filters are available within the media in use? Which sources have features available that push the information to the user based on chosen criteria?

Some such sources are …

–Industry and trade organizations, especially including websites, magazines, newsletters, forums, and roundtables.
–Social media.
–News outlets such as print, Internet, and cable television.
–Think tanks and consultants.
–Governmental and quasi-governmental organizations.
–Personnel using cutting-edge technology.

Unforeseen financial related fraud events most often arise from a lack of information.  To be effective, information gathering must expand beyond those sources that are most familiar to risk assessment professionals and to others like CFEs involved in risk management; the more diverse the sources, the more effective the information gathering. Gathering information from only neutral sources may seem on the surface to be the most effective strategy; but this can create a severe deficit of information. Information from sources in competition with or in opposition to the client organization should be included. This will include information from sources that have a different political stance, moral compass, or divergent viewpoint. Gathering information from governmental organizations should include a wide variety of domestic and international sources. Information gatherers must evaluate the political purpose behind the information, its slant, and the reliability of the information.

Unforeseen fraud events can be devastating to an organization, not just because they are catastrophic, but because they are unexpected and initially mysterious in nature. But like all events, if they can be better understood and anticipated, their effects can be managed and mitigated so they will not be as damaging to the organization.  The use of as many information sources as possible, including those internet based,  is key to assessing their risk and potential impact.

Assessing the Unknown

Some level of uncertainty and risk must exist in any fraud examination involving financial statement fraud. For example, there may be uncertainty about the competence of management and the accounting staff, about the effectiveness of internal controls, about the quality of evidence, and so on. These uncertainties or risks are commonly classified as inherent risks, control risks, or detection risks.

Assessing the degree of risk present and identifying the areas of highest risk are critical initial steps in detecting financial statement fraud. The auditor specifically evaluates fraud risk factors when assessing the degree of risk and approaches this risk assessment with a high level of professional skepticism, setting aside any prior beliefs about management’s integrity.  Knowledge of the circumstances that can increase the likelihood of fraud, as well as other risk factors, should aid in this assessment.

SAS 99 identifies fraud risk categories that auditors and fraud examiners may evaluate in assessing the risk of fraud. The three main categories of fraud risk factors related to fraudulent financial reporting are management characteristics, industry characteristics and operating characteristics including financial stability.

Management characteristics pertain to management’s abilities, pressures, style, and attitude as they have to do with internal control and the financial reporting process. These characteristics include management’s motivation to engage in fraudulent financial reporting – for instance, compensation contingent on achieving aggressive financial targets; excessive involvement of non-financial management in the selection of accounting principles or estimates; high turnover of senior management, counsel, or board members; strained relationship between management and external auditors; and any known history of securities violations.

Industry characteristics pertain to the economic and regulatory environment in which the entity operates, ranging from stable features of that environment to changing features such as new accounting or regulatory requirements, increased competition, market saturation, or adoption by the company of more aggressive accounting policies to keep pace with the industry.

Operating characteristics and financial stability encompass items such as the nature and complexity of the entity and its transactions, the geographic areas in which it operates, the number of locations where transactions are recorded and disbursements made, the entity’s financial condition, and its profitability. Again, the fraud examiner would look for potential risk factors, such as significant pressure on the company to obtain additional capital, threats of bankruptcy, or hostile take-over.

The two primary categories of fraud risk factors related to asset misappropriation are susceptibility of assets to misappropriation and adequacy of controls.  Susceptibility of assets to misappropriation refers to the nature or type of an entity’s assets and the degree to which they are subject to theft or a fraudulent scheme.  A company with inventories or fixed assets that includes items of small size, high value, or high demand often is more susceptible, as is a company with easily convertible assets such as diamonds, computer chips or large amounts of cash receipts or cash on hand.  Cash misappropriation is also included  in this category through fraudulent schemes such as vendor fraud. Adequacy of controls refers to the ability of controls to prevent or detect misappropriations of assets, owning to the design, implementation and monitoring of such controls.

SAS 99 discusses fraud risk factors in the context of the fraud triangle which we’ve often discussed on this blog.  SAS 99 also suggests that the auditor consider the following attributes of risk:

–Type of risk that may be present – that is fraudulent financial reporting, asset misappropriation and/or corruption.

–Significance of risk – that is whether it could result in a material misstatement.

–Likelihood of the risk

–Pervasiveness of the risk – that is whether it relates to the financial statements as whole or to just particular accounts, transactions or assertions.

Finally, management selection and application of accounting principles are important factors for the examiner to consider.