Category Archives: Code of Conduct

Trust but Check

The community support for a business, and business in general, depends on the credibility that stakeholders place in corporate commitments, the company’s reputation, and the strength of its competitive advantage. All of these depend on the trust that stakeholders place in a company’s activities. Trust, in turn, depends on the values underlying corporate activities. Off-shore accounts, manipulation of shell corporations to evade taxes, loan fraud and management self-dealing are just a few instances of the moral cancer that, drop by drop, erodes trust until the point where the free enterprise systems of democratic nations are replaced by naked oligarchy, kleptocracy and cultures of corruption.

If the interests of all stakeholders are systematically not respected, then action that continues to be often painful to shareholders, officers, and directors usually occurs. In fact, it is unlikely that businesses or professions can achieve their long-run strategic objectives without the support of key stakeholders, such as shareholders, employees, customers, creditors, suppliers, governments, and host communities.

A constant theme and trend (as echoed in the trade press) has become increasingly more evident since the turn of the century. The judgment and moral character of executives, owners, boards of directors, and auditors has been often insufficient, on their own, to prevent increasingly severe corporate, ethical, and governance scandals. Governments and regulators world-wide have been required to constantly tighten guidelines and governance regulations to assure the protection of the public. The self-interested lure of greed has proven to be too strong for many to resist, and they have succumbed to conflicts of interest when left too much on their own. Corporations that were once able to shift jurisdictions to avoid new regulations regarding tax and other matters now are facing global measures designed to expose and control questionable ethics and governance practices. Assurance professionals themselves, of all types, are also facing international standards of behavior.

These changes have come about because of the pressures brought to bear on corporations and management by the reporting of scandals and abuses by a still potent free press and by suits by activist investors and other involved stakeholders. But changes in laws, regulations, and standards are only part of what stakeholders have contributed. The expectations for good ethical behavior and good governance practices have changed. Failure to comply with these expectations now impacts reputations, profits, and careers even if the behavior is strictly within legal boundaries.

As ACFE training tells us, it’s become increasingly evident to most executives, owners, and auditors that their individual success is directly related to their ability to develop and maintain a corporate culture of integrity. They cannot afford the loss of reputation, revenue, reliability, and credibility as a result of a loss of integrity. It is no longer an effective, sustainable, or medium or long-term strategy to project or practice questionable ethics. ACFE training goes on to indicate a number of causes, or signs, of ethical problems within any given corporation:

— Pressure to meet goals, especially financial ones, at any cost;
–A culture that does not foster open and candid conversation and discussion;
–A CEO who is surrounded by people who will agree and flatter the CEO, as well as a CEO whose reputation is ‘beyond criticism’;
–Weak boards that do not exercise their fiduciary responsibilities with diligence;
–An organization that promotes people on the basis of nepotism and favoritism;
–Hubris. The arrogant belief that rules are for other people, but not for us;
–A flawed cost/benefit attitude that suggests that poor ethical behavior in one area can be offset by good ethical behavior in another area.

The LIBOR rate scandal of 2012 is an almost perfect example of ethical collapse and manifests a majority of the red flags enumerated above. The scandal featured the systematic manipulation of a benchmark interest rate, supported by a culture of fraud in the world’s biggest banks, in an environment where little or no regulation prevailed. After decades of abuse that enriched the big banks, their shareholders, executives and traders, at the expense of others, investigations and lawsuits were finally undertaken resulting in prosecutions and huge penalties for the banks and the individual traders involved.

The London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) rate is a rate of interest, first computed in 1985 by the British Banking Association (BBA), the Bank of England and others, to serve as a readily available reference or benchmark rate for many financial contracts and arrangements. Prior to its creation, contracts utilized many privately negotiated rates, which were difficult to verify, and not necessarily related to the market rate for the security in question. The LIBOR rate, which is the average interest rate estimated by leading banks that they would be charged if they were to borrow from other banks, provided a simple alternative that came to be widely used.

At the time of the LIBOR scandal, 18 of the largest banks in the world provided their estimates of the costs they would have had to pay for a variety of interbank loans (loans from other banks) just prior to 11:00 a.m. on the submission day. These estimates were submitted to Reuters news agency (who acted for the BBA) for calculation of the average, and its publication, and dissemination. Reuters set aside the four highest and four lowest estimates and averaged the remaining ten.

So huge were the investments affected that a small manipulation in the LIBOR rate could have a very significant impact on the profit of the banks and of the traders involved in the manipulation.

Insiders to the banking system knew about the manipulation of LIBOR rate submissions for decades, but changes were not made until the public became aware of the problem, and until the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) forced the U.K. government to act. The president of the New York Federal Reserve Bank (Fed), at that time emailed the governor of the Bank of England in June 2008, suggesting ways to “enhance” LIBOR. Although ensuing emails report agreement on the suggestions, and articles appeared in the trade press from 2008 to 2011, serious changes were not applied until October 2012 when the U.K. government accepted the recommendations of the Wheatley Review of Libor. This Review by Martin Wheatley, managing director of British Financial Services Authority, was commissioned in June 2012 in view of investigations, charges and settlements that were raising public awareness of LIBOR deficiencies.

One of the motivations for creating the Wheatley Review involved the prosecution of a former UBS and later Citigroup Inc. trader, on criminal fraud charges for manipulating the LIBOR rates. The trader, known to insiders as the “Rain Man” for his abilities and demeanor, allegedly sought his superiors approval before attempting to influence the LIBOR rates, an act that some observers thought at the time would provide a strong defense against conviction.

Insiders who knew of LIBOR manipulations were generally reluctant to take a public stand for earlier change. However, on July 27, 2012, a former trader for Morgan Stanley in London, published an article that told of his earlier attempts to bring LIBOR rate manipulations to the attention of authorities, but without success. In his article, he indicated how he learned as a new trader in 1991 that the banks manipulated their rate submissions to make profit on specific contracts, and to mask liquidity problems such as during the subprime lending crisis of 2008. For example, if the LIBOR rate submissions were misstated to be low, the discounted valuation of related assets would be raised, thus providing misleadingly higher levels of short-term, near-cash assets than should have been reported.

Numerous studies since the scandal have detailed the effects of unethical LIBOR manipulation. Just two examples of such manipulation. At the time of the scandal many home owners borrowed their mortgage loans on a variable- or adjustable-rate basis, rather than a fixed-rate basis. Consequently, many of these borrowers received a new rate at the first of every month based on the LIBOR rate. A study prepared for a class action lawsuit has shown that on the first of each month for the period 2007-2009, the LIBOR rate rose more than 7.5 basis points on average. As a consequence, one observer estimated that each LIBOR submitting bank may be liable for as much as $2.3 billion.

Municipalities raise funds through the issue of bonds, and many were encouraged to issue variable-rate, rather than fixed-rate, bonds to take advantage of lower interest payments. For example, the saving could be as much as $1 million on a $100 million bond. After issue, the municipalities were encouraged to buy interest rate swaps from their investment banks to hedge their risk of volatility in the variable rates by converting or swapping into a fixed rate arrangement. The seller of the swap agrees to pay the municipality for any requirement to pay interest at more than the fixed rate agreed if interest rates rise, but if interest rates fall the swap seller buys the bonds at the lower variable interest rate. However, the variable rate was linked to the LIBOR rate, which was artificially depressed, thus costing U.S. municipalities as much as $10 billion. Class action suits were eventually launched to recover these losses, which cost municipalities, hospitals, and other non-profits as much as $600 million a year.

At the end of the day, trust in each other and in our counter-parties is all we really have as economic actors; CFE’s and forensic accountants thus have a vital role to play in investigating, documenting and assisting in the identification and possible prosecution of those who, like the LIBOR manipulators, knowingly collude in making the choice to violate that trust.

An Ethical Toolbox

As CFE’s we know organizations that have clearly articulated values and a strong culture of ethical behavior tend to control fraud more effectively. They usually have well-established frameworks, principles, rules, standards, and policies that encompass the attributes of generally accepted fraud control. These attributes include leadership, an ethical framework, responsibility structures, a fraud control policy; prevention systems, fraud awareness, third-party management systems, notification systems, detection systems, and investigation systems.

CFE’s are increasingly being called upon to assist in the planning for an assessment of a client organization’s integrity and ethics safeguards and then as active members of the team performing the engagement. The increasing demand for such assessments has grown out of the increasing awareness that a strong ethical culture is a vital part of effective fraud prevention.  Conducting such targeted research within the client organization, within its industry; and its region will help determine the emerging risk areas and potential gaps in most organizational anti-fraud safeguards. Four key elements of integrity and ethics safeguards have emerged over the past few years.  These are the fraud control plan, handling conflicts of interest, shaping ethical dealings with third parties, and natural justice principles for employees facing allegations of wrongdoing.

The need for a fraud control plan is borne out by an organization’s potential fraud losses; typically, about five percent of revenues are lost to fraud each year, according to the ACFE’s 2016 Report to the Nations on Occupational Fraud and Abuse. A fraud control plan typically will articulate an organization’s fraud risks, controls, and mitigation strategies, including:

–Significant business activities;
–Potential areas of fraud risk;
–Related fraud controls;
–Gaps in control coverage and assurance activities;
–Defined remedial actions to minimize fraud risks;
–Review mechanisms evaluating the effectiveness of fraud control strategies.

Management should review and update the fraud control plan periodically and report the results to the audit committee and senior management. Thus, the role of the board and of the audit committee of the board are vital for the implementation of any ethically based fraud control plan. The chairman of the board is, or should be, the chief advocate for the shareholders, and completely independent of management. It is the chairman’s primary job to direct the company’s executives and drive oversight of their activities in the name of the shareholders. An independent and highly skilled audit committee chairman is essential to maintain a robust system of checks and balances over all operations. To be truly effective, the chairman must be independent of those he or she is charged with watching.  The chairmen of the board and the audit committee must devote material time to their duties. While the board can use the company’s oversight functions to maintain a checks and balances process, there is no substitute for personal, direct involvement. The board must be willing to direct inquiries into allegations of misconduct, and have unquestioned confidential spending authority to conduct reviews and investigations as it deems necessary.

One of the most effective compliance tools available to the board is the day-to-day vigilance of the company’s employees. When an individual employee detects wrongdoing, he or she must have an effective and safe method to report observations, such as a third-party ethics hotline that reports to the chairman of the board and audit committee. All employees must be protected from retribution to avoid any possibility of corrupting the process.

A zero-based budgeting process, requiring that the individual elements of the company’s budget be built from the bottom up, reviewed in detail, and justified, can identify unusual spending in numerous corporate and operating units. This provides an in-depth view of spending as opposed to basing the current year’s spending, in aggregate, on last year’s spending, where irregularities may be buried and overlooked.

In organizations with an internal audit division the overall review would typically be performed by Director of Internal Audit (CAE) whom the CFE and other specialists would support. This review should be integrated into the organization’s wider business planning to ensure synergies exist with other business processes, and should link to the organization-wide risk assessment and to other anti-fraud processes.

The ACFE tells us that there is a growing consensus that managing conflicts of interest is critical to curbing corruption. Reports indicate that unmanaged conflicts of interest continue to cost organizations millions of dollars. To minimize these risks, organizations need a clear and well-understood conflict of interest policy, coupled with practical arrangements to implement and monitor policy requirements. Stated simply, a conflict of interest occurs when the independent judgment of a person is swayed, or might be swayed, from making decisions in the best interest of others who are relying on that judgment. An executive or employee is expected to make judgments in the best interest of the company. A director is legally expected to make judgments in the best interest of the company and of its shareholders, and to do so strategically so that no harm and perhaps some benefit will come to other stakeholders and to the public interest. A professional accountant is expected to make judgments that are in the public interest. Decision makers usually have a priority of duties that they are expected to fulfill, and a conflict of interests confuses and distracts the decision maker from that duty, resulting in harm to those legitimate expectations that are not fulfilled. Sometimes the term apparent conflict of interest is used, but it is a misnomer because it refers to a situation where no conflict of interest exists, although because of lack of information someone other than the decision maker would be justified in concluding (however tentatively) that the decision maker does have one

A special or conflicting interest could include any interest, loyalty, concern, emotion, or other feature of a situation tending to make the decision maker’s judgment (in that situation) less reliable than it would normally be, without rendering the decision maker incompetent. Commercial interests and family connections are the most common sources of conflict of interest, but love, prior statements, gratitude, and other subjective tugs on judgment can also constitute interest in this sense.

The perception of competing interests, impaired judgment, or undue influence also can be a conflict of interest. Good practices for managing conflicts of interest involve both prevention and detection, such as:

–Promoting ethical standards through a documented, explicit conflict of interest policy as well as well-stated values and clear conflicts provisions in the code of ethics;
–Identifying, understanding, and managing conflicts of interest through open and transparent communication to ensure that decision-making is efficient, transparent, and fair, and that everyone is aware of what to do if they suspect a conflict;
–Informing third parties of their responsibilities and the consequences of noncompliance through a statement of business ethics and formal contractual requirements;
–Ensuring transparency through well-established arrangements for declaring and registering gifts and other benefits;
–Ensuring that decisions are made independently, with evidence that staff and contractors routinely declare all actual, potential, and perceived conflicts of interests, involving at-risk areas such as procurement, management of contracts, human resources, decision-making, and governmental policy advice;
–Establishing management, internal controls, and independent oversight to detect breaches of policy and to respond appropriately to noncompliance.

Contemporary business models increasingly involve third parties, with external supplier costs now representing one of the most significant lines of expenditure for many organizations. Such interactions can provide an opportunity for fraud and corruption. An enterprise’s strong commitment to ethical values needs to be communicated to suppliers through a Statement of Business Ethics. Many forward-thinking organizations already have codes of ethics in place that set out the values and ethical expectations of both their board members and staff. The board code of conduct should define the behavioral standards for members, while the staff code of conduct should detail standards for employee conduct and the sanctions that apply for wrongdoing. Similar statements also are appropriate for third parties such as suppliers, service providers, and business partners.

A statement of business ethics outlines both acceptable and unacceptable practices in third-party dealings with an organization. Common features include:

–The CEO’s statement on the organization’s commitment to operating ethically;
–The organization’s values and business principles;
–What third parties can expect in their dealings with the organization and the behaviors expected of them;
–Guidance related to bribery, gifts, benefits, hospitality, travel, and accommodation; conflicts of interest; confidentiality and privacy of information; ethical communications; secondary employment; and other expectations.
–Contact information for concerns, clarification, reporting of wrongdoing, and disputes.

Once established, the organization needs to implement a well-rounded communication strategy for the statement of business ethics that includes education of staff members, distribution to third parties, publication on the organization’s website, references to it in the annual report, and inclusion in future tender proposals and bid packs.

Engaged and capable employees underpin the success of most organizations, yet management does not always recognize the bottom-line effects and employee turnover costs when innocent employees are the subject of allegations of fraud and other wrongdoing. About 60 percent of allegations against employees turn out to be unsubstantiated, according to the ACFE. A charter of rights compiles in a single document all the information that respondents to allegations of wrongdoing may require. Such a charter should be written in an easy-to-understand style to meet the needs of its target audience. It should:

–Outline the charter’s purpose, how it will operate, how it supports a robust complaints and allegations system, and how it aligns with the organization’s values;
–Describe how management handles workplace allegations and complaints, and ensure principles of natural justice and other legislative obligations, such as privacy, are in place;
–Provide a high-level overview diagram of the allegation assessment and investigation process, including the channels for submitting allegations; the distinct phases for logging, assessing, and investigating the allegations; and the final decision-making phase;
–Include details of available support such as contact information for human resource specialists, details about an external confidential employee help line, and processes for updates throughout the investigation;
–Illustrate the tiered escalation process for handling allegations that reflects (at one end) how issues of a serious, sensitive, or significant nature are addressed, and encourages (at the other end) the handling of low level localized issues as close to the source as possible;
–Provide answers to frequent questions that respondents might have about the process for dealing with allegations, such as “What can I expect?” “Are outcomes always reviewable?” “What does frivolous and vexatious mean?” “What will I be told about the outcome?” and “What happens when a process is concluded?”;
–Outline the options for independent reviews of adverse investigation outcomes.

For Appearance Sake

By Rumbi Petrozzello, CPA/CFF, CFE
2017 Vice-President – Central Virginia Chapter ACFE

Last Thursday, the 15th of June 2017, the New York State Senate Committee on Ethics and Internal Governance met. The previous sentence reads like a big yawn with which no one, beyond perhaps the members of the committee itself, would be concerned. However, this meeting was big news. The room was packed with members of the media and every member of the committee was in attendance. Why? Because this was the first meeting the committee had empaneled since 2009, as confirmed by the committee’s published archive of events. It turns out that it was indeed a big deal that all committee members were in attendance because, for eight years straight, none of the committee members had attended a single meeting.

If you are thinking that the ethics committee did not meet for eight years because there were no ethical issues to discuss and our state’s legislative leadership practiced only ethical and upright behavior, you would be sorely mistaken. John Sampson, the State Senator who chaired the committee at that last meeting in 2009 was found guilty, of obstruction of justice and of lying to federal agents in 2015 and sentenced to jail time in January 2017. Evidently, taking their cues from the tone at the top evidenced by the leadership of their ethics committee, during the same eight-year meeting hiatus, seven other state senators were convicted on charges that included mail fraud, looting a nonprofit and bribery.

So, you might ask, what happened at the meeting last week? The committee had come together to discuss stipends, that are supposed to go to committee chairs, that were apparently also being paid to committee vice-chairs (and, in one case, to a deputy vice-chair, whatever that is). There was a motion proposed to stop making these payments to anyone but the committee chair. It seems that just coming together was more than enough work for the committee and, therefore, they tabled the motion, a motion that would not even have been binding, until its next meeting. It should be noted that two of the senators receiving this chair stipend, as vice-chairs, serve on the ethics committee and both voted to postpone voting on the motion. It would be laughable if it were a laughing matter.

Think about where you work and about all the clients with whom we work, as fraud examiners and forensic accountants. We work with our clients and with those who employ us to suggest comprehensive policies that cover good business practices and ethical behaviors and actions. Reading about the shenanigans of the State Senate Committee on Ethics recalled several thoughts:

The assumption that personnel will automatically be motivated to behave as corporate owners want is no longer valid. People are motivated more by self-interest than in the past and are likely to come from backgrounds that emphasize different priorities of duty. As a result, there is greater need than ever for clear guidance and for identifying and effectively managing threats to good governance and accountability.

Even when different employee backgrounds are not an issue, personnel can misunderstand the organization’s objectives and their own role and fiduciary duty. For example, many directors and employees at Enron evidently believed that the company’s objectives were best served by actions that brought short term profit:

—through ethical dishonesty, manipulation of energy markets or sham displays of trading floors;
—through book keeping that was illusory;
—through actions that benefited themselves at the expense of other stakeholders.

Frequently, employees are tempted to cut ethical corners, and they have done so because they believed that their top management wanted them to; they were ordered to do so; or they were encouraged to do so by misguided or manipulative incentive programs. These actions occurred although the board of directors would have preferred (sometimes with hindsight) that they had not. Personnel simply misunderstood what was expected by the board because guidance was unclear or they were led astray and did not understand that they were to report the problem for appropriate corrective action, or to whom or how.

Among our clients, lack of proper guidance or reporting mechanisms may have been the result of directors and others not understanding their duties as fiduciaries. Directors owe shareholders and regulators several duties, including obedience, loyalty, and due care. Recognition of the increasing complexity, volatility and risk inherent in modern corporate interests and operations, particularly as their scope expands to diverse groups and cultures has led to the requirement for risk identification, assessment and management systems.

  • If our client businesses want to do an excellent job at implementing effective ethics programs, orientation of new employees should always involve a review of the code of ethical practice by the staff tasked with compliance and with enforcing policies. How many entities are actively practicing what they preach during such sessions? The values that a company’s directors wish to instill to motivate the beliefs and actions of its personnel need to be conveyed to provide the required guidance. Usually, such guidance takes the form of a code of conduct that states the values selected, the principles that flow from those values, and any rules that are to be followed to ensure that appropriate values are respected.
  • After orientation, what steps are companies taking to maintain their ethics programs on an on-going basis? Principles are more useful to employees than just rules because principles facilitate interpretation when the precise circumstances encountered do not exactly fit the rules prescribed. A blend of principles and rules is often optimal in maintaining of a code of conduct in the long term.
  • Is leadership periodically coming together to talk about where their firm stands when it comes to ethics and compliance? A code on its own may be nothing more than ‘ethical art’ that hangs on the wall but is rarely studied or followed. Experience has revealed that, to be effective, a code must be reinforced by a comprehensive ethical culture.
  • Is anyone reviewing how whistleblowing claims are being dealt with? Does the company even have a whistleblower program? If so, does the staff even know about it and how it works? Whistle-blowers are part of a needed monitoring, risk management and remediation system.
  • Is leadership setting a positive tone at the top and displaying the behaviors that it is demanding from employees? The ethical behavior expected must be referred to in speeches and newsletters by top management as often as they refer to their health and safety programs, or to their antipollution program or else it will be viewed as less important by employees. If personnel never or rarely hear about ethical expectations, they will perceive them as not a serious priority.

Once, I worked at a company where senior management smoked in the office; behavior that is illegal and was, on paper, not allowed. When staff members complained to human resources, no corrective action was taken. Frustrated, some staff members called the city hotline to file a report. Following visits from the city, human resources put up no smoking signs and then notices encouraging employees to keep reports of inappropriate staff smoking internal. By only paying lip service to policy, this company’s management seemed populated by future candidates for the State’s Senate Ethics Committee. But my former employer doesn’t stand alone as evidenced by frauds at Wells Fargo and at others. A company can pull out screeds of rules and regulations, but what matters most is what the staff knows and what the leadership does.

In the case of the New York State Senate Committee on Ethics and Internal Governance, what it did was delay a vote on the issues before it until the next meeting. And when will the next meeting be? After taking eight years to set up its last meeting, the committee was in no hurry to set a date for the next. They adjourned without scheduling the next one. They did, however, take a moment to congratulate themselves on attending this meeting. You can’t forget the important stuff.

Fraud Risk Assessing the Trusted Insider

A bank employee accesses her neighbor’s accounts on-line and discloses this information to another person living in the neighborhood; soon everyone seems to be talking about the neighbor’s financial situation. An employee of a mutual fund company accesses his father-in-law’s accounts without a legitimate reason or permission from the unsuspecting relative and uses the information to pressure his wife into making a bad investment from which the father-in-law, using money from the fund account, ultimately pays to extricate his daughter. Initially, out of curiosity, an employee at a local hospital accesses admission records of a high-profile athlete whom he recognized in the emergency room but then shares that information (for a price) with a tabloid newspaper reporter who prints a story.

Each of these is an actual case and each is a serious violation of various Federal privacy laws. Each of these three scenarios were not the work of an anonymous intruder lurking in cyberspace or of an identity thief who compromised a data center. Rather, this database browsing was perpetrated by a trusted insider, an employee whose daily duties required them to have access to vast databases housing financial, medical and educational information. From the comfort and anonymity of their workstations, similar employees are increasingly capable of accessing personal information for non-business reasons and, sometimes, to support the accomplishment of actual frauds. The good news is that CFE’s can help with targeted fraud risk assessments specifically tailored to assess the probability of this threat type and then to advise management on an approach to its mitigation.

The Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission’s (COSO’s) 2013 update of the Internal Control Integrated Framework directs organizations to conduct a fraud risk assessment as part of their overall risk assessment. The discussion of fraud in COSO 2013 centers on Principle 8: “The organization considers the potential for fraud in assessing risks to the achievement of objectives.” Under the 1992 COSO framework, most organizations viewed fraud risk primarily in terms of satisfying the U.S. Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 requirements to identify fraud controls to prevent or detect fraud risk at the transaction level. In COSO 2013, fraud risk becomes a specific component of the overall risk assessment that focuses on fraud at the entity and transaction levels. COSO now requires a strong internal control foundation that addresses fraud broadly to encompass company objectives as part of its strategy, operations, compliance, and reporting. Principle 8 describes four specific areas: fraudulent financial reporting, fraudulent nonfinancial reporting, misappropriation of assets, and illegal acts. The inclusion of non-financial reporting is a meaningful change that addresses sustainability, health and safety, employment activity and similar reports.

One useful document for performing a fraud risk assessment is Managing the Business Risk of Fraud: A Practical Guide, produced by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, and by our organization, the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, as well as by the Institute of Internal Auditors. This guide to establishing a fraud risk management program includes a sample fraud policy document, fraud prevention scorecard, and lists of fraud exposures and controls. Managing the Business Risk of Fraud advises organizations to view fraud risk assessment as part of their corporate governance effort. This commitment requires a tone at the top that embraces strong governance practices, including written policies that describe the expectations of the board and senior management regarding fraud risk. The Guide points out that as organizations continue to automate key processes and implement technology, thus allowing employees broad access to sensitive data, misuse of that data becomes increasingly difficult to detect and prevent. By combining aggressive data collection strategies with innovative technology, public and private sector organizations have enjoyed dramatic improvements in productivity and service delivery that have contributed to their bottom line. Unfortunately, while these practices have yielded major societal benefits, they have also created a major challenge for those charged with protecting confidential data.

CFE’s proactively assessing client organizations which use substantial amounts of private customer information (PCI) for fraud risk should expect to see the presence of controls related to data access surveillance. Data surveillance is the systematic monitoring of information maintained in an automated, usually in a database, environment. The kinds of controls CFE’s should look for are the presence of a privacy strategy that combines the establishment of a comprehensive policy, an awareness program that reinforces the consequences of non-business accesses, a monitoring tool that provides for ongoing analysis of database activity, an investigative function to resolve suspect accesses and a disciplinary component to hold violators accountable.

The creation of an enterprise confidentiality policy on the front end of the implementation of a data surveillance program is essential to its success. An implementing organization should establish a data access policy that clearly explains the relevant prohibitions, provides examples of prohibited activity and details the consequences of non-business accesses. This policy must apply to all employees, regardless of their title, seniority or function. The AICP/ACFE Guide recommends that all employees, beginning with the CEO, be required to sign an annual acknowledgment affirming that they have received and read the confidentiality policy and understand that violations will result in the imposition of disciplinary action. No employees are granted access to any system housing confidential data until they have first signed the acknowledgment.

In addition to issuing a policy, it is imperative that organizations formally train employees regarding its various provisions and caution them on the consequences of accessing data for non-business purposes. During the orientation process for new hires, all employees should receive specialized training on the confidentiality policy. As an added reminder, prior to logging on to any database that contains personal information, employees should receive an electronic notice stating that their activities are being monitored and that all accesses must be related to an official business purpose. Employees are not granted access into the system until they electronically acknowledge this notice.

Given that data surveillance is a process of ongoing monitoring of database activity, it is necessary for individual accesses to be captured and maintained in a format conducive to analysis. There are many commercially available software tools which can be used to monitor access to relational databases on a real-time basis. Transaction tracking technology, as one example, can dynamically generate Structured Query Language (SQL), based upon various search criteria, and provides the capability for customized analyses within each application housing confidential data. The search results are available in Microsoft Excel, PDF and table formats, and may be printed, e-mailed and archived.

Our CFE client organizations that establish a data access policy and formally notify all employees of the provisions of that policy, institute an ongoing awareness program to reinforce the policy and implement technology to track individual accesses of confidential data have taken the initial steps toward safeguarding data. These are necessary components of a data surveillance program and serve as the foundation upon which the remainder of the process may be based. That said, it is critical that organizations not rely solely on these components, as doing so will result in an unwarranted sense of security. Without an ongoing monitoring process to detect questionable database activity and a comprehensive investigative function to address unauthorized accesses, the impact of the foregoing measures will be marginal.

The final piece of a data surveillance program is the disciplinary process. The ACFE tells us that employees who willfully violate the policy prohibiting nonbusiness access of confidential information must be disciplined; the exact nature of which discipline should be determined by executive management. Without a structured disciplinary process, employees will realize that their database browsing, even if detected, will not result in any consequence and, therefore, they will not be deterred from this type of misconduct. Without an effective disciplinary component, an organization’s privacy protection program will ultimately fail.

The bottom line is that our client organizations that maintain confidential data need to develop measures to protect this asset from internal as well as from external misuse, without imposing barriers that restrict their employees’ ability to perform their duties. In today’s environment, those who are perceived as being unable to protect the sensitive data entrusted to them will inevitably experience an erosion of consumer confidence, and the accompanying consequences. Data surveillance deployed in conjunction with a clear data access policy, an ongoing employee awareness program, an innovative monitoring process, an effective investigative function and a standardized disciplinary procedure are the component controls the CFE should look for when conducting a proactive fraud risk assessment of employee access to PCI.

Rigging the Casino

I attended an evening lecture some weeks ago at the Marshall-Wythe law school of the College of William & Mary, my old alma mater, in Williamsburg, Virginia. One of the topics raised during the lecture was a detailed analysis of the LIBOR scandal of 2012, a fascinating tale of systematic manipulation of a benchmark interest rate, supported by a culture of fraud in the world’s biggest banks, and in an environment where little or no regulation prevailed.

After decades of abuse that enriched the big banks, their shareholders, executives and traders, at the expense of others, investigations and lawsuits were finally initiated, and the subsequent fines and penalties were huge. The London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) rate is a rate of interest, first computed in 1985 by the British Banking Association (BBA), the Bank of England and others, to serve as a readily available reference or benchmark rate for many financial contracts and arrangements. Prior to its creation, contracts utilized many privately negotiated rates, which were difficult to verify, and not necessarily related to the market rate for the security in question. The LIBOR rate, which is the average interest rate estimated by leading banks that they would be charged if they were to borrow from other banks, provided a simple alternative that came to be widely used. For example, in the United States in 2008 when the subprime lending crisis began, around 60 percent of prime adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) and nearly all subprime mortgages were indexed to the US dollar LIBOR. In 2012, around 45 percent of prime adjustable rate mortgages and over 80 percent of subprime mortgages were indexed to the LIBOR. American municipalities also borrowed around 75 percent of their money through financial products that were linked to the LIBOR.

At the time of the LIBOR scandal, 18 of the largest banks in the world provided their estimates of the costs they would have had to pay for a variety of interbank loans (loans from other banks) just prior to 11:00 a.m. on the submission day. These estimates were submitted to Reuters news agency (who acted for the BBA) for calculation of the average and its publication and dissemination. Reuters set aside the four highest and four lowest estimates, and averaged the remaining ten.

So huge were the investments affected that a small manipulation in the LIBOR rate could have a very significant impact on the profit of the banks and of the traders involved in the manipulation. For example, in 2012 the total of derivatives priced relative to the LIBOR rate has been estimated at from $300-$600 trillion, so a manipulation of 0.1% in the LIBOR rate would generate an error of $300-600 million per annum. Consequently, it is not surprising that, once the manipulations came to light, the settlements and fines assessed were huge. By December 31, 2013, 7 of the 18 submitting banks charged with manipulation, had paid fines and settlements of upwards of $ 2 billion. In addition, the European Commission gave immunity for revealing wrongdoing to several the banks thereby allowing them to avoid fines including: Barclays €690 million, UBS €2.5 billion, and Citigroup €55 million.

Some examples of the types of losses caused by LIBOR manipulations are:

Manipulation of home mortgage rates: Many home owners borrow their mortgage loans on a variable- or adjustable-rate basis, rather than a fixed-rate basis. Consequently, many of these borrowers receive a new rate at the first of every month based on the LIBOR rate. A study prepared for a class action lawsuit has shown that on the first of each month for 2007-2009, the LIBOR rate rose more than 7.5 basis points on average. One observer estimated that each LIBOR submitting bank during this period might have been liable for as much as $2.3 billion in overcharges.

Municipalities lost on interest rate swaps: Municipalities raise funds through the issuance of bonds, and many were encouraged to issue variable-rate, rather than fixed-rate, bonds to take advantage of lower interest payments. For example, the saving could be as much as $1 million on a $100 million bond. After issue, the municipalities were encouraged to buy interest rate swaps from their investment banks to hedge their risk of volatility in the variable rates by converting or swapping into a fixed rate arrangement. The seller of the swap agrees to pay the municipality for any requirement to pay interest at more than the fixed rate agreed if interest rates rise, but if interest rates fall the swap seller buys the bonds at the lower variable interest rate. However, the variable rate was linked to the LIBOR rate, which was artificially depressed, thus costing U.S. municipalities as much as $10 billion. Class action suits were launched to recover these losses which cost municipalities, hospitals, and other non-profits as much as $600 million a year; the remaining liability assisted the municipalities in further settlement negotiations.

Freddie Mac Losses: On March 27, 2013, Freddie Mac sued 15 banks for their losses of up to $3 billion due to LIBOR rate manipulations. Freddie Mac accused the banks of fraud, violations of antitrust law and breach of contract, and sought unspecified damages for financial harm, as well as punitive damages and treble damages for violations of the Sherman Act. To the extent that defendants used false and dishonest USD LIBOR submissions to bolster their respective reputations, they artificially increased their ability to charge higher underwriting fees and obtain higher offering prices for financial products to the detriment of Freddie Mac and other consumers.

Liability Claims/Antitrust cases (Commodities-manipulations claims): Other organizations also sued the LIBOR rate submitting banks for anti-competitive behavior, partly because of the possibility of treble damages, but they had to demonstrate related damages to be successful. Nonetheless, credible plaintiffs included the Regents of the University of California who filed a suit claiming fraud, deceit, and unjust enrichment.

All of this can be of little surprise to fraud examiners. The ACFE lists the following features of moral collapse in an organization or business sector:

  1. Pressure to meet goals, especially financial ones, at any cost;
  2. A culture that does not foster open and candid conversation and discussion;
  3. A CEO who is surrounded with people who will agree and flatter the CEO, as well as a CEO whose reputation is beyond criticism;
  4. Weak boards that do not exercise their fiduciary responsibilities with diligence;
  5. An organization that promotes people based on nepotism and favoritism;
  6. Hubris. The arrogant belief that rules are for other people, but not for us;
  7. A flawed cost/benefit attitude that suggests that poor ethical behavior in one area can be offset by good ethical behavior in another area.

Each of the financial institutions involved in the LIBOR scandal struggled, to a greater or lesser degree with one or more of these crippling characteristics and, a distressing few, manifested all of them.

Beyond the Sniff Test

Many years ago, I worked with a senior auditor colleague (who was also an attorney) who was always talking about applying what he called “the sniff test” to any financial transaction that might represent an ethical challenge.   Philosophical theories provide the bases for useful practical decision approaches and aids like my friend’s sniff test, although we can expect that most of the executives and professional accountants we work with as CFEs are unaware of exactly how and why this is so. Most seasoned directors, executives, and professional accountants, however, have developed tests and commonly used rules of thumb that can be used to assess the ethicality of decisions on a preliminary basis. To their minds, if these preliminary tests give rise to concerns, a more thorough analysis should be performed using any number of defined approaches and techniques.

After having heard him use the term several times, I asked my friend him if he could define it.  He thought about it that morning and later, over lunch, he boiled it down to a series of questions he would ask himself:

–Would I be comfortable as a professional if this action or decision of my client were to appear on the front page of a national newspaper tomorrow morning?
–Will my client be proud of this decision tomorrow?
–Would my client’s mother be proud of this decision?
–Is this action or decision in accord with the client corporation’s mission and code?
–Does this whole thing, in all its apparent aspects and ramifications, feel right to me?

Unfortunately, for their application in actual practice, although sniff tests and commonly used rules are based on ethical principles and are often preliminarily useful, they rarely, by themselves, represent a sufficiently comprehensive examination of the decision in question and so can leave the individuals and client corporations involved vulnerable to making unethical decisions.  For this reason, more comprehensive techniques involving the impact on client stakeholders should be employed whenever a proposed decision is questionable or likely to have significant consequences.

The ACFE tells us that many individual decision makers still don’t recognized the importance of stakeholder’s expectations of rightful conduct. If they did, the decisions made by corporate executives and by accountants and lawyers involved in the Enron, Arthur Andersen, WorldCom, Tyco, Adephia, and a whole host of others right up to the present day, might have avoided the personal and organizational tragedies that occurred. Some executives were motivated by greed rather than by enlightened self-interest focused on the good of all. Others went along with unethical decisions because they did not recognize that they were expected to behave differently and had a duty to do so. Some reasoned that because everyone else was doing something similar, how could it be wrong? The point is that they forgot to consider sufficiently the ethical practice (and duties) they were expected to demonstrate. Where a fiduciary duty was owed to future shareholders and other stakeholders, the public and personal virtues expected (character traits such as integrity, professionalism, courage, and so on), were not sufficiently considered. In retrospect, it would have been wise to include the assessment of ethical expectations as a separate step in any Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) process to strengthen governance and risk management systems and guard against unethical, short-sighted decisions.

It’s also evident that employees who continually make decisions for the wrong reasons, even if the right consequences result, can represent a high governance risk.  Many examples exist where executives motivated solely by greed have slipped into unethical practices, and others have been misled by faulty incentive systems. Sears Auto Center managers were selling repair services that customers did not need to raise their personal commission remuneration, and ultimately caused the company to lose reputation and future revenue.  Many of the classic financial scandals of recent memory were caused by executives who sought to manipulate company profits to support or inflate the company’s share price to boost their own stock option gains. Motivation based too narrowly on self-interest can result in unethical decisions when proper self-guidance and/or external monitoring is lacking. Because external monitoring is unlikely to capture all decisions before implementation, it is important for all employees to clearly understand the broad motivation that will lead to their own and their organization’s best interest from a stakeholder perspective.

Consequently, decision makers should take motivations and behavior expected by stakeholders into account specifically in any comprehensive ERM approach, and organizations should require accountability by employees for those expectations through governance mechanisms. Several aspects of ethical behavior have been identified as being indicative of mens rea (a guilty mind).  If personal or corporate behavior does not meet shareholder ethical expectations, there will probably be a negative impact on reputation and the ability to reach strategic objectives on a sustained basis in the medium and long term.

The stakeholder impact assessment broadens the criteria of the preliminary sniff test by offering an opportunity to assess the motivations that underlie the proposed decision or action. Although it is unlikely that an observer will be able to know with precision the real motivations that go through a decision maker’s mind, it is quite possible to project the perceptions that stakeholders will have of the action. In the minds of stakeholders, perceptions will determine reputational impacts whether those perceptions are correct or not. Moreover, it is possible to infer from remuneration and other motivational systems in place whether the decision maker’s motivation is likely to be ethical or not. To ensure a comprehensive ERM approach, in addition to projecting perceptions and evaluating motivational systems, the decisions or actions should be challenged by asking such questions as:

Does the decision or action involve and exhibit the integrity, fairness, and courage expected? Alternatively, does the decision or action involve and exhibit the motivation, virtues, and character expected?

Beyond the simple sniff test, stakeholder impact analysis offers a formal way of bringing into a decision the needs of an organization and its individual constituents (society). Trade-offs are difficult to make, and can benefit from such advances in technique. It is important not to lose sight of the fact that the concepts of stakeholder impact analysis need to be applied together as a set, not as stand-alone techniques. Only then will a comprehensive analysis be achieved and an ethical decision made.

Depending on the nature of the decision to be faced, and the range of stakeholders to be affected, a proper analysis could be based on any of the historical approaches to ethical decision making as elaborated by ACFE training and discussed so often in this blog.  A professional CFE can use stakeholder analysis in making decisions about financial fraud investigations, fraud related accounting issues, auditing procedures, and general practice matters, and should be ready to prepare or assist in such analyses for employers or clients just as is currently the case in other areas of fraud examination. Although many hard-numbers-oriented executives and accountants will be wary of becoming involved with the “soft” subjective analysis that typifies stakeholder and ethical expectations analysis, they should bear in mind that the world is changing to put a much higher value on non-numerical information. They should be wary of placing too much weight on numerical analysis lest they fall into the trap of the economist, who, as Oscar Wilde put it: “knew the price of everything and the value of nothing.”

Talking Through the Hindrances

That control self-assessment (CSA) can be used as an effective facilitation tool to develop fraud risk assessments is, I’m sure, of no surprise to many of the readers of this blog.  But, for those of you who are not so aware … typically, a control self-assessment session to identify fraud risk is a facilitated meeting of managerial and operational staff (the business process experts) coming together to openly discuss fraud risk prevention objectives related to identified risk factors associated with one or more of a company’s business processes.

Fraud prevention objectives for the business process are identified, as well as obstacles impeding the success of those objectives.  Finally, the team suggests, for upper management consideration, ways to overcome identified obstacles and a proposed corrective action plan is prepared.  At the start of the self-assessment session, the participants adopt a Team Operating Agreement to ensure that an open and honest discussion takes place in a threat free environment.  It takes a consensus of the participants to approve the operating agreement which all the participants in the session sign; no management decisions regarding actions to be taken are made during the session.

After the Operating Team Agreement is in place, team members typically develop and approve what they perceive to be a list of fraud prevention objectives for the target business process under discussion.  Once the anti-fraud objectives are defined, the participants enter a discussion (and develop a list) of what they feel to be the existing overall fraud prevention strengths of the subject process.  Next, the team discusses and develops a list of the hindrances currently preventing the process from achieving its anti-fraud related objectives.  Finally, the team develops recommendations for overcoming the identified hindrances.  Sometimes the team ranks its fraud reduction recommendations by order of importance but this step is not critical.

A CSA for fraud prevention is akin to a risk assessment brainstorming session.  For example, the scope of such a session regarding a financial reporting related business process might be tailored to the risks of financial statement fraud and misstatement as well as to the issue of management override of controls over financial statement reporting.  The objective of the CSA is for the team to identify and discuss fraud risks, fraud scenarios and mitigating controls followed by the preparation of a set of recommendations for referral to management.

For each risk factor identified the CSA team should:

–try to identify what would cause a fraud to occur, or detail the risk factor itself;
–determine the specific fraud risk;
–determine potential fraud schemes or scenarios associated with the risk;
–identify affected financial accounts;
–identify staff positions that could potentially be involved;
–try to assess the type, likelihood, significance and inherent risk involved;
–formulate the controls that could mitigate the risk;
–classify the controls by type (i.e., preventative, detective, entity, and process level);
–identify and assess residual risk.

Certified fraud examiners (CFE’s) have an active role to play in tailoring the CSA format for use in risk identification and mitigation as well as in performing actual facilitation of the CSA sessions.   Specifically, CFE’s can help client staff develop a more detailed, in-depth understanding of complex fraud risks that management and operational staff sometimes only vaguely perceive.  Armed with the knowledge developed during the CAE session(s) and coupled with their risk assessment and group facilitation skills, CFE’s can assist management and the audit committee of the client to identify, assess, and develop final fraud risk mitigation strategies to strengthen the fraud prevention program of the organization as a whole.  Following what are sometimes multiple CAE sessions, CFE’s can assist the team in detailing the menu of anti-fraud measures developed during the individual sessions in a report to client management embodying the anti-fraud recommendations of the CAE session members to the Executive Management Team and to the audit committee for their consideration.  It’s up to top management to decide which of the CSA team’s anti-fraud recommendations to implement and which of the team’s identified risks to accept.

Just a few of the advantages of conducting fraud prevention related CAE’s for critical client business processes include:

–building fraud risk awareness among those middle level managers charged with day-to- day management of our client companies business processes;
–mapping organization wide fraud prevention efforts to specific business processes;
–establishing links between information technology (IT) systems development projects and the broader fraud prevention program;
–identifying, documenting and integrating fraud prevention skill sets across all the business processes of the organization;
–support for the construction of a strong, management supported fraud prevention program that enjoys full management and board support company wide.

Finally, consider the advantages that the self assessment process brings to the ethical dimension of the utilizing enterprise.  The values that a corporation’s managers and directors wish to instill in order to motivate the beliefs and actions of its personnel need to be conveyed to provide the required guidance.  Usually such guidance takes the form of a code of conduct that states the values selected, the principles that flow from those values, and any rules that are to be followed to ensure that the appropriate values are respected.

The code of conduct itself is a worthy subject for a series of separate control self assessment sessions composed of representative levels of company staff such as the management team, lower level management and the operating staff.  The results of these sessions can be analyzed and a final comprehensive report produced documenting the comments (and even suggested revisions) that CSA participants have made regarding the code during their respective sessions.  This exercise is, thus,  an excellent vehicle to build “ownership of the code” among the staff comprising all levels of the enterprise.