Tag Archives: Foreign Corrupt Practices Act

Bribery & Deferred Prosecution

Between January and February 2015, a prominent trade organization focusing on American attorneys conducted a survey of 243 Chief Legal Officers of global companies to assess the corporate counsel’s opinion regarding the greatest threats to their organization’s growth. Respondents were asked to rank their top three concerns. Not surprisingly, economic uncertainty was at the top of the list with 57% of the respondents ranking it in their top three. The unexpected finding was that 53% of the respondents named regulatory compliance and enforcement as a top concern as well.

When asked to specify which laws caused them the most concern 28% identified the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and 15% identified the UK Bribery Act. This means 43% of the respondents named anti-bribery laws as one of their top three concerns, more than any other law or regulation identified. When asked about the resources spent on regulatory compliance and enforcement, the response was also surprising as only 38% of the corporate counsel who identified regulatory compliance and enforcement as a threat, are expending resources to address the threat. As a follow up to the 2015 survey, the same organization conducted a second survey in early 2017 to gain further insight into corporate counsels’ ability to address regulatory and compliance threats. This time 256 respondents were surveyed, 62% of whom stated that their organization is designing or building some type of robust internal compliance program. Although this is movement in the right direction, over a third of the organizations surveyed still may not be prepared to detect or deter bribery and corruption. Most significantly, they will not be prepared to meet government expectations if a violation occurs and self-reporting is required. Lastly, 54% of the respondents stated that they are building or expanding their in-house systems to address this threat. Many believe that compliance technology is the appropriate answer as regulators prefer technical solutions to these problems, because they are viewed to be sophisticated and ‘state of the art’.

This research should be of special interest to all CFEs because we work so frequently with corporate counsels, but indeed, to assurance professionals in general who like fraud examiners are on the front line in the fight against corruption.

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) was enacted in 1977 but aggressive enforcement did not really pick up until around 2005 when there were twelve enforcement actions.  The purpose of the FCPA was to prevent the bribery of foreign government officials when negotiating overseas contracts. The FCPA imposes heavy fines and penalties for both organizations and individuals. The two major provisions address: 1) bribery violations and 2) improper books and records and/or having inadequate internal controls. Methods of enforcement and interpretation of the law in the US have continued to evolve over the years.

The FCPA created questions of definition and interpretation, i.e., Who is a “foreign official?” What is the difference between a “facilitation” payment and a bribe? Who is considered a third party? How does the government define adequate internal controls to detect and deter bribery and corruption?

The enactment of the United Kingdom (UK) Bribery Act in July 2010 was the first attempt at an anti-bribery law to address some of these issues. The UK Bribery Act introduced the concept of adequate procedures, that if followed could allow affirmative defense for an organization if investigated for bribery. The UK Bribery Act recommended several internal controls for combating bribery and introduced the incentive of a more favorable result for those who could document compliance. These controls include:

• Established anti-bribery procedures
• Top level commitment to prevent bribery
• Periodic and documented risk assessments
• Proportionate due diligence
• Communication of bribery prevention policies and procedures
• Monitoring of anti-bribery procedures

The concept of an affirmative defense for adequate procedures creates quite a contrast to FCPA which only offers affirmative defense for payments of bona fide expenses or small gifts within the legal limits of the foreign countries involved.

The UK Bribery Act equated all facilitation and influence payments to bribery. Finally, the UK Bribery Act dealt with the problem of defining a foreign official by making it illegal to bribe anyone regardless of government affiliation. Several countries such as Russia, Canada and Brazil have enacted or updated their anti-bribery regulations to parallel the guidelines presented in the UK Bribery Act. The key to the effectiveness of all these acts remains enforcement.

In November 2012 the US Department of Justice and the Securities Exchange Commission released “A Resource Guide to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.” The guide book introduced several hallmarks of an effective compliance program. The Resource Guide provided companies with the tools to demonstrate a proactive approach to deter bribery and corruption. Companies in compliance may receive some consideration during the fines and penalty stage.

The guide’s hallmarks include:

• Establish a code of conduct that specifically addresses the risk of bribery and corruption.
• Set the tone by designating a Chief Compliance Officer to oversee all anti-bribery and corruption activities.
• Training all employees to be thoroughly prepared to address bribery and corruption risk.
• Perform risk assessments of potential bribery and corruption pitfalls by geography and industry.
• Review the anti-corruption program annually to assess the effectiveness of policies procedures and controls.
• Perform audits and monitor foreign business operations to assure compliance with the code of conduct.
• Ensure that proper legal contractual terms exist within agreements with third parties that address compliance with anti-bribery and corruption laws and regulations.
• Investigate and respond appropriately to all allegations of bribery and corruption.
• Take proper disciplinary action for violations of anti-bribery and corruption laws and regulations.
• Perform adequate due diligence that addresses the risk of bribery and corruption of all third parties prior to entering a business relationship.

The SEC and DOJ entered into the first ever Non-Prosecution Agreement (NPA) for Foreign Corrupt Practices violations in 2013. This decision was a harbinger from the DOJ and SEC with regard to future enforcement actions. The NPA highlighted the “extensive remedial measurements and cooperation efforts” that the defendant company demonstrated during the investigation. The corporation paid only $882,000 in fines because they were able to “demonstrate a strong tone from the top and a robust anti-corruption program”.

Under a Deferred Prosecution Agreement (DPA) the DOJ files a court document charging the organization while simultaneously requesting that prosecution be deferred to allow the company to demonstrate good conduct going forward. The DPA is an agreement by the organization to: cooperate with the government, accept the factual findings of the investigation, and admit culpability if so warranted. Additionally, companies may be directed to participate in compliance and remediation efforts, e.g., a court-appointed monitor.

If the company completes the term of the DPA, the DOJ will dismiss the charges without imposing fines and penalties. Under the Non-Prosecution Agreement, the DOJ maintains the right to file charges against the organization later should the organization fail to comply. The NPA is not filed with the courts but is maintained by both the DOJ and the company and is posted on the DOJ website. Like the DPA, the organization agrees to monetary penalties, ongoing cooperation, admission to relevant facts, as well as compliance and remediation of policies, procedures and controls. If the company complies with the agreement, the DOJ will drop all charges.

The key differences between a deferred prosecution case and one not featuring deferred prosecution is the initial response of the defendant company to the discovery of improper payments. In a deferred prosecution case the response usually features prompt self-reporting, full cooperation with the government and the quality of the serious remedial steps taken, including termination of implicated personnel and the modification of company behavior in the country where the violations occurred. Additionally, deferred prosecution defendants frequently discover the improper payments while in the process of enhancing their anti-bribery and corruption controls.

Originally allegations of FCPA violations were received through a company’s internal whistleblower hotline. That trend changed with the enactment of the Sarbanes Oxley Act in 2002 and the Dodd-Frank Act in 2012. These laws created other means and mechanisms for reporting suspicions of illegal activity and provided protections from retaliation against whistleblowers. The Dodd-Frank Act also has monetary incentives of 10% to 30% of the amounts recovered by the government to encourage whistleblowers to come forward. Companies considering whether to disclose potential anti-corruption problems to the SEC must now consider the possibility that a potential whistleblower may report it first to the government thus creating greater liability for the organization.

In conclusion, according to recent reporting by the ACFE, corporate compliance programs continue to mature, and are now accepted as a cost of conducting business in a global marketplace. The US government continues to clarify its expectations about corporate responsibility at home and abroad and works with international partners and their compliance programs. Increased cooperation between the public and private sectors to address these issues will assist in leveling the playing field in the global marketplace. Non-government and civil society organizations, i.e. World Bank and Transparency International play a key role in this effort. These organizations set standards, apply pressure on foreign governments to enact stricter anti-bribery and corruption laws, and enforce those laws. Coordination and cooperation among government, business and civil entities like the ACFE, reduce the incidences of bribery and corruption and increase opportunities for companies to compete fairly and ethically in the global marketplace.

Facilitation or Bribe?

LondonBridge2During our recent live training event on November 12th , Tom Gober, our speaker, alluded to the importance of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act as a piece of US government regulation of which it behooves all fraud examiners to be aware. Tom’s reference got me to thinking about the confusion that still persists regarding certain provisions of the Act among corporate players (as reported in the financial trade press following several recent high profile prosecutions). Enacted to great fanfare in 1977, the purpose of the FCPA was to prevent the bribery by the agents of US corporations of foreign government officials when those agents were negotiating overseas contracts. The FCPA imposes heavy fines and penalties for both organizations and individuals. The two major provisions address: 1) bribery violations and 2) improper corporate books and records as well as maintenance of inadequate internal controls. Understandably, methods of enforcement and interpretation of the law in the US have continued to evolve to the present day.

From the first, the FCPA spawned questions of definition and interpretation for those trying to comply, i.e., who is a “foreign official?” What is the difference between a “facilitation” payment and a bribe? Who is considered a third party? How does the government define “adequate” internal controls to detect and deter bribery and corruption?

The United Kingdom enacted its UK Bribery Act in July 2010 which really represented the first real attempt at an anti-bribery law to address some of these issues. The UK Bribery Act introduced the concept of “adequate procedures”, that if followed could allow affirmative defense for an organization under investigation for bribery. The UK Bribery Act recommended several internal controls for combating bribery and offered the incentive of a more favorable result for those who could document compliance. Among the controls:

• Establish anti-bribery procedures;
• A top corporate level commitment to prevent bribery;
• Periodic and documented risk assessments;
• Proportionate due diligence;
• Communication of bribery prevention policies and procedures to all involved parties in corporate transactions;
• Monitoring of anti-bribery procedures.

The concept of an affirmative defense for adequate procedures creates quite a contrast to the US FCPA which only offers affirmative defense for payments of bona fide expenses or small gifts within the legal limits of the foreign countries involved. The UK Bribery Act simply equates all facilitation and influence payments to bribery, thus eliminating much confusion. Finally, the UK Bribery Act dealt with the problem of defining a foreign official by making it illegal to bribe anyone regardless of government affiliation. Several countries such as Russia, Canada and Brazil have enacted or updated their anti-bribery regulations to parallel the guidelines presented in the UK Bribery Act. The key to their effectiveness remains enforcement.

Then, in 2010, the US Department of Justice and the Securities Exchange Commission released a guide book introducing several hallmarks of an effective FCPA compliance program. The publication of the guidebook is a development which, according to Tom Gober, many auditors and CFE’s remain unaware, even to this day. The Resource Guide provides our client companies with the tools to demonstrate a proactive approach to the deterrence of bribery and corruption. Companies found out of compliance may receive some consideration during the fines and penalty stage of their cases.

The guidebook recommends that companies doing business overseas:

• Establish a code of conduct that specifically addresses the risk of bribery and corruption;
• Set the tone by designating a Chief Compliance Officer to oversee all anti-bribery and anti-corruption activities;
• Train all employees to be thoroughly prepared to address bribery and corruption risk and document that the training took place;
• Perform fraud risk assessments of potential bribery and corruption pitfalls by country and industry;
• Review the anti-corruption program annually to assess the effectiveness of policies, procedures and controls;
• Perform audits (routine and surprise) and monitor foreign business operations to assure strict compliance with the published code of conduct;
• Ensure proper legal contractual terms exist within agreements with third parties that address compliance with anti-bribery and corruption laws and regulations;
• Investigate and respond promptly and appropriately to all allegations of bribery and corruption;
• Take proper disciplinary action for violations of anti-bribery and corruption laws and regulations;
• Perform adequate due diligence that addresses the risk of bribery and corruption performed by third parties prior to entering into any business relationship.

Fraud examiners should make their clients aware that a company which can provide evidence of compliance with these recommendations is afforded many advantages if they’re ever charged with a violation of the Act. Among them is a Deferred Prosecution Agreement (DPA). Under a Deferred Prosecution Agreement the Department of Justice files a court document charging the organization while simultaneously requesting prosecution be deferred in order to allow the company to demonstrate good conduct going forward. The DPA is an agreement by the organization to: cooperate with the government, accept the factual findings of the investigation, and admit culpability if so warranted. Additionally, companies may be directed to participate in compliance and remediation efforts, e.g., a court-appointed monitor. If the company completes the term of the DPA the DOJ will dismiss the charges without imposing fines and penalties!

The DOJ and the company may alternatively even enter into a Non-Prosecution Agreement. Under such an agreement the DOJ retains the right to file charges against the organization at a later time should the organization fail to comply. The NPA is not filed with the courts but is maintained by both the DOJ and the company and posted on the DOJ website. Similar to the DPA, the organization agrees to monetary penalties, ongoing cooperation, admission to relevant facts, as well as compliance and remediation of policies, procedures and controls. If the company complies with the agreement, the DOJ will, again, drop all charges.

The good news is that, since publication of the guidebook, corporate compliance programs have continued to mature, and are now generally accepted as just another cost of conducting business in a global marketplace. The US government is continuing to clarify expectations with regard to corporate responsibility at home and abroad, and working with international partners and their compliance programs. Increased cooperation between the public and private sectors to address these issues will assist in leveling the playing field in the global marketplace. Non-government and civil society organizations, i.e. World Bank and Transparency International are playing a key role in this effort. These organizations set standards, apply pressure on foreign governments to enact stricter anti-bribery and corruption laws, and enforce those laws. Coordination and cooperation among government, business and civil entities, reduce the incidence of bribery and corruption and increase opportunities for companies to compete fairly and ethically in the global marketplace. Hence, every fraud examiner and assurance professional should strongly support these efforts while strongly encouraging our clients to comply with the provisions of the 2010 guidebook.